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13 results for Health care providers--Law and legislation
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Record #:
19954
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1977 North Carolina General Assembly has considered many bills affecting health care providers. This article gives a brief description of some of them and their status as of April 30, 1977.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 47, 1977, p1-4
Record #:
26264
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health department officers and employees should be aware of circumstances under which they could be sued for their official conduct, or found liable to pay damages. Lawsuits under both state and federal rules may be brought against the board of health or the health department as extensions of the county.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 61, Feb 1983, p1-8, f
Record #:
26263
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina law requires school and health workers to cooperate in attending to children’s health and learning needs. There are state statutes on school health, health education, immunization, ability to participate in activities, communicable disease, and child abuse and neglect.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 62, Apr 1983, p1-8, f
Record #:
26262
Author(s):
Abstract:
In assessing school health problems, it is the privacy issues that seem most difficult ethically as well as legally. Such issues involve stigmatizing conditions, confidentiality, obligations of school employees, counseling and record keeping.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 63, May 1983, p1-7, f
Record #:
26274
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s hospital lien law was enacted in 1935 to alleviate the burden on hospitals of treating accident victims who could not pay but would later recover substantial sums in damages from court actions or out-of-court settlements. The law offers illusory relief to medical providers and discomfits insurance carriers, attorneys, and court clerks who are uncertain of their obligations. The state legislature is reviewing a proposed statute that solves many of the problems contained in the original law.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 51, Feb 1979, p1-13, f
Record #:
26273
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1981, the Governmental Evaluation Commission will conduct an appraisal of the performance of state professional licensing boards in the health care field. A critical area in licensing legislation is the language authorizing boards to enforce a code of professional conduct. In several cases, the state supreme court has found such statutes to be an unconstitutional delegation of legislative authority from the General Assembly to the licensing board.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 52, Apr 1979, p1-12, f
Record #:
26268
Abstract:
State legislators met last year for both a regular session and a special budget session on the impact of federal budget cuts. Nursing homes, midwives, nurses, and septic tanks were among the many subjects that received legislative attention. Much of the significant new health legislation addresses occupational licensure, malpractice liability, regulation of hospital rates, and abortion.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 57, Feb 1982, p1-17, f
Record #:
26272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Decisions from the 1979 General Assembly of North Carolina broadened the powers of local health directors, amended several licensing laws, and clarified the brain-death law. One very significant change was an act allowing pharmacists to substitute less expensive generic drugs for brand-name drugs that are prescribed.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 53, July 1979, p1-14, f
Record #:
26271
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1977, North Carolina created the Governmental Evaluation Commission to conduct formal, periodic evaluations of state regulatory programs. The Commission will evaluate the health licensing boards and examine the membership composition for professional bias.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 54, Dec 1979, p1-20, f
Record #:
26275
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twentieth-century medical progress has required the nurse to act more independently of the physician as the nurse observes, assesses, and instructs the patient. Nursing practice acts, professional declarations, and court decisions have identified these three activities as nursing functions.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 50, July 1978, p1-12, f
Record #:
26278
Author(s):
Abstract:
Physician’s assistants and nurse practitioners are new types of medical care specialists. Debate over the legitimacy of these two professions was resolved by legal comparisons and definitions of their roles in health services.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 44, Oct 1974, p1-4, f
Record #:
26310
Author(s):
Abstract:
The family nurse practitioner is a newly developing type of nurse contributing to the solution of problems of health care access and the shortage of health manpower. Legal considerations will cover legal definitions of nursing, potential liability, the supervising physician and hospital, and suggested practices to observe.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 22, Mar 1971, p1-9, f
Record #:
30185
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina health care providers are dealing with changes in population and procedures, the latter brought by the Patient Privacy and Affordable Care Act. They also manage growing rates of chronic diseases and face multiple challenges in providing care. A panel of health care experts examines these issues and prescribes solutions.
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