NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for School-age children
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
15959
Author(s):
Abstract:
Urban and regional planners forecast population size and number of school-aged children to estimate the demand for public facilities and services over near-term and long-term planning horizons. They also estimate the economic, environmental and fiscal impacts of new development projects on local jurisdictions. State planners forecast public-school enrollments generated by county-level residential development and demographic change.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1997, p14-19
Full Text:
Record #:
26263
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina law requires school and health workers to cooperate in attending to children’s health and learning needs. There are state statutes on school health, health education, immunization, ability to participate in activities, communicable disease, and child abuse and neglect.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 62, Apr 1983, p1-8, f
Record #:
26262
Author(s):
Abstract:
In assessing school health problems, it is the privacy issues that seem most difficult ethically as well as legally. Such issues involve stigmatizing conditions, confidentiality, obligations of school employees, counseling and record keeping.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 63, May 1983, p1-7, f
Record #:
26967
Author(s):
Abstract:
Melinda Ruley visited elementary, junior high, and high schools in North Raleigh to review school lunch periods. She observed how lunch is a critical time of day when children and teenagers are judged by their peers and worry about being cool. Ruley notes that this situation continues into adulthood.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Feb 25-Mar 9 1988, p24-27, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35685
Abstract:
The authors assured that no degree or work experience in education was necessary for creating this effective teaching tool, whether parents sought to educate, entertain, or encourage their children. Especially promoted, though, was the potential for instilling reading skills and enhancing parent-child bonding.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p11-15