NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


35 results for Public health--Laws and legislation
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
17228
Abstract:
When the legislature convened everyone knew that North Carolina's program for health and hospitals would come in for a major consideration given war-time conditions. At the 1945 General Assembly, a foundation was laid for extensive future development.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 11 Issue 2-7, July 1945, p17-18, 59-60
Record #:
17605
Abstract:
Municipal authorities and civic-minded citizens alike have long been frustrated in their attempts to keep vacant city lots from becoming jungles of weeds; however, city officials are hesitant to utilize ordinances that may exercise too much of the state's power for aesthetic purposes. Thus, the authorities of the Wilmington-New Hanover City-County Health Department are approaching the problem from health perspective to garner support for tackling the weeds.
Source:
Record #:
17681
Abstract:
Cochrane discusses the changes in health from the beginning of North Carolina's history to the present. Laws have been and still continue to be changed in hopes of coinciding with changes in public health.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 20 Issue 7, Apr 1954, p7-9
Record #:
17824
Abstract:
North Carolina 1955 General Assembly faced a number of changes in bills related to mental health, persons with tuberculosis, and provisions for obtaining vital statistics.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 21 Issue 9, June 1955, p27-29, 34
Record #:
17929
Abstract:
One of the most voluminous bills to be passed by the 1957 North Carolina General Assembly completely rewrote the public health laws of North Carolina, some of which were dated from the 1700s. Some of the major changes involved administration, the development of health departments, immunization, infectious and venereal disease, mosquito control, and sanitation districts to name a few.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Sept 1957, p46-48, 57
Record #:
17986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health legislation enacted in the 1969 North Carolina General Assembly cut across a number of state agencies and affected the practice of several health professions. Measures included increased medical assistance to the needy, financial assistance to two private medical schools in the state, and the education and certification of nurses.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 2, Oct 1969, p14-19
Record #:
18034
Author(s):
Abstract:
By their very nature, regulations that protect society in general usually inhibit the personal freedom of people as individual citizens. Public health practices are at the forefront of this relationship. For example, North Carolina requires compulsory examination for venereal disease of applicants for a marriage license and inmates in jails.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 37 Issue 3, Nov 1970, p15-17
Record #:
18073
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation in the 1971 North Carolina General Assembly focused on the appropriations for state health agencies and special programs, special funding for health education, and regulations over home health agencies.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 1, Sept 1971, p74-77
Record #:
26268
Abstract:
State legislators met last year for both a regular session and a special budget session on the impact of federal budget cuts. Nursing homes, midwives, nurses, and septic tanks were among the many subjects that received legislative attention. Much of the significant new health legislation addresses occupational licensure, malpractice liability, regulation of hospital rates, and abortion.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 57, Feb 1982, p1-17, f
Record #:
26267
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1982 session of the General Assembly made significant changes in North Carolina health laws. Its major emphasis was on regulating both health workers and costs of care at the state and local government levels and in the private sector.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 58, Aug 1982, p1-6, f
Record #:
26284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Control of public health nuisances is becoming a more demanding task. The Institute of Government conducted a survey of local health departments to determine the extent of activity in dealing with nuisances and other environmental problems. The study concluded that there seems to be no uniformity of enforcement and most counties report little use of their public nuisance powers.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 38, Dec 1973, p1-8, f
Record #:
26282
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several significant statutes were enacted to enhance the ability of local health departments to protect and advance public health. Among these are new provisions to revise composition of local boards of health, establish state standards for public health services, and increase state financial support.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 40, Feb 1974, p1-4, f
Record #:
26285
Author(s):
Abstract:
This year’s legislative session addressed issues of accessibility of care, systems utilization, agency organization, and program structure and content. Actions were taken to deal with septic-tank regulation, abortion, immunization requirements, and a number of other problems.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 37, July 1973, p1-7, f
Record #:
26292
Author(s):
Abstract:
States impose regulatory measures that restrict individual freedom in the name of public health. North Carolina requires compulsory examinations of and immunizations for communicable diseases, but for the most part, people accept these measures.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 30, Feb 1972, p1-3, f
Record #:
26311
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health professionals are being called to assist in the formulation and consideration of health care legislation. North Carolina faces an overwhelming number of issues, including issues related to health manpower, blood bank operations, first aid, and dentistry.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 21, Feb 1971, p1-6, f