NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Liability (Law)
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6797
Author(s):
Abstract:
Students in North Carolina's public schools are openly identifying themselves as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender with some of them are reporting harassment from some of their peers to school officials. The article discusses some of the federal and state decisions from other jurisdictions that North Carolina courts are likely to consider if called upon to analyze the potential liability of school boards or employees for peer harassment of gay students. Measures that North Carolina school boards can implement to prevent this form of harassment are included. To date, no cases of this type have come before North Carolina's courts.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 34 Issue 4, Fall 2003, p16-29, f
Full Text:
Record #:
9095
Author(s):
Abstract:
Environmental health specialists often are concerned about the prospect of being sued by a person who is disgruntled about a permit application denial, permit suspension or revocation, or other negative action. Aimee discusses some of the legal concepts and concerns, including Why would a specialist be sued? Who would be sued? Would the plaintiff win? And Who pays for judgments and settlements?
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 86, May 2007, p1-7, f
Full Text:
Record #:
9090
Author(s):
Abstract:
Saxon summarizes the \"legal principles that govern the liability of state and county social services agencies, officials and employees in lawsuits brought under North Carolina's tort law.\"
Source:
Social Services Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7749 A45x), Vol. Issue 42, June 2007, p1-11, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
26259
Author(s):
Abstract:
A topic of discussion among psychiatrists and therapists in North Carolina has been potential liability for injuries to other persons caused by violent patients under their care. Litigation dealing with this liability is based on the law of negligence. Psychotherapists have the duty to act when they believe the patient is dangerous to a readily identifiable victim.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 66, Feb 1984, p1-8, f
Record #:
26264
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health department officers and employees should be aware of circumstances under which they could be sued for their official conduct, or found liable to pay damages. Lawsuits under both state and federal rules may be brought against the board of health or the health department as extensions of the county.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 61, Feb 1983, p1-8, f
Record #:
26333
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among the subjects discussed at the Annual Conference for Local Health Directors in the fall of 1961 was that of liability for negligence. A few other legal matters that were discussed include legal requirements for venereal disease lab reports, minimum requirements for burial of dead bodies, and membership on county boards of health.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 7, May 1962, p1-8, f
Record #:
28738
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly requires state and local government to cooperatively fund and manage service and regulatory programs in public health, social services, mental health, and other areas. There is dispute over which entity is held liable when a citizen is injured by the negligent act of a local government employee administering such a program.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 68, May 1995, p1-7, f
Record #:
28737
Abstract:
Some North Carolina state and local public officials enjoy immunity from personal liability for tors committed in the course of fulfilling their public duties. The reasons for protecting public officials are often at tension with the public policy underlying other rules.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 67, Apr 1995, p1-8, f
Record #:
28743
Abstract:
In Meyer v. Wall, the North Carolina Supreme Court clarified several rules of public liability relevant to citizen injuries caused by negligent acts of local governments administering programs cooperatively funded and managed by the state. This bulletin discusses those rules and the legal responsibility of local and state governments.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 88, July 1998, p1-5, f
Record #:
30498
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the reasons why many business firms incorporate is the limited liability feature of the corporate firm, but the shareholder’s liability for corporate obligations is limited to capital contributions. This article examines situations in which a corporation’s creditors and other claimants may have recourse against the personal assets of shareholders, and discusses legal procedures under the North Carolina Business Corporation Act.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Jan 1987, p7-9, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30588
Abstract:
This article describes and discusses some of the trends as well as specific legal and marketing issues related to alcohol and tobacco advertising and product liability in North Carolina. Examining how these trends have emerged may help businesses understand what directions they may take.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan 1989, p2-6, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30614
Author(s):
Abstract:
The legal doctrine of respondeat superior imposes liability on employers for the actions of their employees under certain conditions. This article discusses some of the circumstances under which this doctrine applies and its recent use in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Summer 1991, p5-7, il, bibl, f