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22 results for Local government--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
2254
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dillon's Rule is a principle used by North Carolina courts to determine whether a local government has the authority to engage in a specific activity. Bell analyzes two 1994 cases in which this rule was invoked.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 66, Mar 1995, p1-7, f
Record #:
3474
Abstract:
Laws governing the purchase and disposal of property by local governments have been revised by the General Assembly effective July 1, 1997. Changes include raising formal bid limits on certain items from $20,000 to $30,000.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 79, June 1997, p1-3, por
Record #:
5166
Author(s):
Abstract:
If a member of a local governing board (city council or county board of commissioners) becomes disruptive during a meeting, or embarrasses the board in some way outside a meeting, how may a board deal with that member? Removal from the meeting and censure are possible choices. Blum discusses the constitutional and statutory issues surrounding a board's disciplinary actions.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 99, Aug 2001, p1-5, f
Record #:
11426
Author(s):
Abstract:
Five legislative acts of the North Carolina General Assembly affect the responsibilities and finances of counties and the state. These include capping the state tax on motor fuels at 29.9 cents per gallon through June 30, 2009 and giving counties the authority to participate in financing highway construction and maintenance. Walden examinees the ramifications for county budgets and transportation choices.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 74 Issue 2, Winter 2009, p4-15, il, map, f
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Record #:
17982
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina local governments have historically enjoyed less freedom from direct legislative control than local governments do nationally because of the state's extreme reliance on local legislation in the General Assembly. This has caused many problems over the years until the 1969 General Assembly passed the home rule law that granted counties, cities, and towns more authority.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Sept 1969, p52-57
Record #:
18204
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1967 General Assembly organized a commission to review local governments on efficiency and function within the more encompassing state government. Findings from this commission report were presented to the General Assembly in 1969. Proposals for improving local government included constitutional reform, developing a state agency for local affairs, and restructuring local legislative control.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 6, Mar 1969, p1-4, 24
Record #:
28711
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drug testing of employees in both the public and private sectors of North Carolina involves important policy considerations, including its substantial cost and the legal issues involved. This article examines the Fourth Amendment questions involved when a state or local government drug tests its employees.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 26, Oct 1986, p1-4, f
Record #:
28710
Abstract:
This bulletin discusses the authority of North Carolina local governments to license and regulate the conduct of businesses, and occupations and the statutory and constitutional limitations on the exercise of that authority.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 25, Aug 1983, p1-7, f
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Record #:
28709
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina local governments are frequently authorized or required to publish legal notices in a newspaper. This bulletin traces the requirements of G.S. 1-597 and related statutes.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 22, Jan 1983, p1-9, f
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Record #:
28721
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Supreme Court decision in City of Richmond v. J.A. Croson Co. has major implications for North Carolina local governments that wish to encourage the use of minority contractors in public procurement and construction and repair projects. Recent state amendments require local governments to adopt minority business participation goals.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 37, Oct 1989, p1-8, f
Record #:
28719
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two significant developments concerning drugs in the workplace are the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, and the first United States Supreme Court rulings on the constitutionality of drug testing in the public sector. This bulletin summarizes the new act and rulings, and offers advice to local government employers in complying with their requirements.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 35, May 1989, p1-7, f
Record #:
28720
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May and June of 1989, the United States Supreme Court announced three decisions interpreting Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This bulletin discusses the three rulings, applications of disparate impact and disparate treatment analyses, and implications for North Carolina local governments.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 36, July 1989, p1-6, f
Record #:
28725
Abstract:
This bulletin reviews the 1993 solid-waste management legislation enacted in North Carolina. Legislation covers training for incinerator operators, landfill permits, taxation and management of disposal, and recycling.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 50, Aug 1993, p1-5, f
Record #:
28732
Abstract:
A central legal question in most lawsuits challenging flow control has been whether a flow-control ordinance, which directs solid waste generated within a local government’s boundaries, violates the commerce clause of the United States Constitution. Implications to solid waste management in North Carolina are discussed.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 59, June 1994, p1-3, f
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Record #:
28734
Author(s):
Abstract:
This bulletin summarizes a United States Supreme Court decision that struck down a local ordinance that prohibited a resident of Ladue, Missouri, from displaying an antiwar sign in a window of her home. It discusses implications for North Carolina local governments wishing to regulate the display of signs on residential property.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 61, Aug 1994, p1-5, f
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