NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for United States. Supreme Court--Decisions
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
18093
Abstract:
Crumpler and Watts lay down the objectives and details of recent United States and North Carolina Supreme Court Decisions regarding search and seizure, double jeopardy, felony-murder, Miranda rights, confessions, and photographic identification.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Mar 1972, p7-12
Record #:
28713
Abstract:
The United States Supreme Court case of First English Evangelical Lutheran Church of Glendale v. County of Los Angeles, California involved a flood-plain regulation that prevented rebuilding on a tract where a major flood had washed away buildings on the plaintiff’s campground. When a local government adopts an unconstitutional taking, it must pay the property owner compensation.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 29, July 1987, p1-3, f
Full Text:
Record #:
28714
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Supreme Court decision in Nollan v. California Coastal Commission declared an unconstitutional taking of a small beachfront property for a public access easement. The implications of the case for North Carolina governments emphasize the rights of private property and coastal development regulations.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 30, Aug 1987, p1-6, f
Full Text:
Record #:
28716
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Clara Watson v. Ft. Worth Bank and Trust, the United States Supreme Court held that the disparate impact analysis method of proving discrimination could be applied to subjective employment practices. This disparate treatment case was similar to Griggs v. Duke Power Company in North Carolina.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 32, July 1988, p1-5, f
Record #:
28720
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May and June of 1989, the United States Supreme Court announced three decisions interpreting Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This bulletin discusses the three rulings, applications of disparate impact and disparate treatment analyses, and implications for North Carolina local governments.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 36, July 1989, p1-6, f
Record #:
28724
Author(s):
Abstract:
On June 25, 1993, the United States Supreme Court re-examined intentional discrimination claims in St. Mary’s Honor Center v. Hicks. This bulletin discusses the case and implications for North Carolina employers.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 49, June 1993, p1-8, f
Record #:
28731
Author(s):
Abstract:
On May 31, 1994, the United States Supreme Court decided a case involving the First Amendment free speech rights of public employees, Waters v. Churchill. This bulletin summarizes the Court’s decision and offers some observations on its likely impact on North Carolina local government employers.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 58, June 1994, p1-4, f
Record #:
29949
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Supreme Court in the recent decision of Greene v. Lindsey limited the use of posting as a method of service of process in summary ejectment cases. The decision was narrow and did not rule that service of process by posting was unconstitutional in every case. Greene involved a statute similar to North Carolina’s, which requires more effort to locate defendants before allowing service by posting.
Source:
Record #:
29942
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Supreme Court has ruled that the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule does not apply in certain law enforcement circumstances. This memorandum discusses the Court’s ruling in two cases, and its application in North Carolina.
Source:
Record #:
29953
Author(s):
Abstract:
A United States Supreme Court decision held that the death penalty is an unconstitutionally disproportionate punishment for felony murder when the State does not prove that the defendant himself killed or was associated with killing a victim. This memorandum analyzes the Court’s decision and suggests ways to implement it under North Carolina’s death penalty procedures.
Source: