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7 results for Tobacco--Advertising
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Record #:
8901
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Tobacco advertising has changed through the years. Early 19th-century advertisements featured men and women joyously smoking and walking together. J.B. Duke created the first major tobacco advertising campaign with Bull Durham cigarettes. He also sold the first cigarettes marketed for women: White Rose and American Beauties, and conceived the idea of including picture-cards in cigarette packs that served as advertisement and stiffened the cigarette box offering greater protection for the tobacco. In 1911 R.J. Reynolds began a marketing campaign that focused on only one cigarette -- Camels.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p34-35, il, por
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Record #:
10197
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Rogers recounts the life of Durham tobacco manufacturer, civic leader, merchant, and realtor, William T. Blackwell. He was the first to use “Bull Durham” as a trade name for the tobacco his company manufactured.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Aug 1948, p10-11, 23, por, bibl
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Record #:
14608
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In the early 1940s, the Washington tobacco market attempted to become competitive in lucrative tobacco markets. Employing ingenuity and creativity to the company's advertising scheme, the solution was to organize a traveling show. The group of men travelled to rural communities in Washington to sing and tell anecdotes, generally entertaining the crowd and promoting the product.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 22, Oct 1946, p3-4, 19, il
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Record #:
24485
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This article presents the history of cigarettes, tobacco, and smoking in North Carolina, as well as presenting a number of historic advertisements for cigarettes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p10-15, il
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Record #:
30588
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This article describes and discusses some of the trends as well as specific legal and marketing issues related to alcohol and tobacco advertising and product liability in North Carolina. Examining how these trends have emerged may help businesses understand what directions they may take.
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Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan 1989, p2-6, il, bibl, f
Record #:
31306
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The Mail Pouch ad campaign dated back to 1897, when Aaron and Samuel Bloch decided to test the market for a by-product produced in their Wheeling, West Virginia stogie plant. Farmers helped to advertise the experimental chewing tobacco on their barns, in exchange for tobacco as payment. After the program ended, the painted barns discontinued and they are now recognized as a vanishing American folk art.
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Record #:
31382
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North Carolina native L.A. (Speed) Riggs was the American Tobacco Company auctioneer who became the “Voice of Lucky Strike” cigarettes on radio and television commercials for more than three decades. The Tobacco History Corporation and Duke Homestead recently sponsored an event in honor of Riggs and had a display of Riggs’ lifetime collection of auctioneering memorabilia. Now 75 years old, Riggs stays busy with his charity work and nationwide tours.
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