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12 results for Tobacco industry--History
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Record #:
7748
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Abstract:
A 6,000 square foot museum to preserve the memory of tobacco farm life was established in Kenly. The museum houses collections which range from quilts to farm equipment. Admission is free.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 3, Aug 1986, p22-23, il
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Record #:
14725
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Abstract:
The tobacco industry was in its infancy in the years preceding the Civil War. Then came a period of great expansion, and today the industry has grown large.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 21, Oct 1944, p3, 22
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Record #:
16910
Abstract:
Tobacco has captured the public's attention as concerns about public health, regulation of sales and advertising, and changes in farm legislation raise questions about the future of tobacco production in the US. These questions are of particular relevance to North Carolina where tobacco has historically played a significant role in the state's economy. This article explores the changing economy and geography of tobacco in eastern North Carolina over the past thirty years.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 6 Issue , Summer 1998, p22-33, bibl, f
Record #:
19748
Abstract:
Tobacco production in the state before the Civil War was a modest industry still largely more successful in southern Virginia. The author argues that even though tobacco production was limited before the war, what was in place led to the tobacco boom post-war. The article includes statistical data concerning the distribution of tobacco factories and projected output values between 1850 and 1860.
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Record #:
20623
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Tobacco prices were greatly affected by both the Depression and the overproduction in 1933. Governor John Christoph Blucher Ehringhaus became an instrumental figure in unifying the state's tobacco growers in an effort to regulate and reduce production so that costs would go up. The author describes Governor Ehringhaus' efforts to restore the state's tobacco market through both state and national legislation.
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Record #:
24460
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North Carolina’s tobacco heritage is preserved at the Tobacco Farm Life Museum in Kenly. It provides a monument to one of North Carolina’s most important industries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 1, June 1991, p32-34, il
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Record #:
24485
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This article presents the history of cigarettes, tobacco, and smoking in North Carolina, as well as presenting a number of historic advertisements for cigarettes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p10-15, il
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Record #:
24543
Abstract:
This article discusses the Living Tobacco Museum and how it will preserve North Carolina’s tobacco industry and heritage. It is located at the Duke Homestead State Historic Site in Durham.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 11, April 1976, p19-21, il, por
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Record #:
25715
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Abstract:
East Carolina history professor Dr. Roger Biles has previously studied the New Deal, the Depression era, and other issues that have affected major urban areas. Now, Biles is turning his attention to the towns that tobacco built.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p31 Periodical Website
Record #:
8290
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1865, after the end of the Civil War, large-scale tobacco manufacturing developed in Winston-Salem and Durham. Roberts discusses inventions that helped to change the industry. One was the Bull Jack, a machine that filled muslin bags about the size of a pack of playing cards with smoking tobacco and applied labels to the bags. Rufus Lenoir Patterson of Salem was the inventor. John Thomas Dalton invented a bow tier to automatically tie the strings on the muslin bags. James Bonsack, a Virginia teenager, invented the Bonsack machine for making cigarettes, a device that eliminated the need to roll cigarettes by hand.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p12-13, il, por
Record #:
30325
Author(s):
Abstract:
For over 200 years, tobacco has been a dependable crop for agricultural progress and profit. Tobacco is a $450 million crop, accounting for between 50 and 60% of the state's farm income. And the value of tobacco as a manufactured product produces a commodity of over $2 billion, furnishing a livelihood for over 300,000 farmers.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 11 Issue 6, November 1953, p88, 90, 92, 94, por
Record #:
31543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tobacco is still America’s largest cash crop that is most dependent on manual labor, mules, plows and pegs. Of all tobaccos, Bright Leaf has been most receptive to mechanization. This article discusses the heritage of tobacco farming in Caswell County, and how farming operations have evolved with technology.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Feb 1979, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website