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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Tobacco farms
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Record #:
383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four factors - mechanization, farm unit size, the lease and transfer system, and labor displacement - have dramatically transformed the operation of flue-cured tobacco farms.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, June 1981, p14-17, il, bibl, f
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Full Text:
Record #:
4242
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, every tobacco farm had one - a pack house, or barn, a one-and-a-half to two-story building, where cured tobacco was brought for grading and tying before going to market. Today, replaced by mechanization and modern bulk curing barns, pack houses are reminders of bygone days. They dot the countryside with their leaning, weathered, sometimes ivy-covered, walls.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 8, Aug 1999, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24460
Abstract:
North Carolina’s tobacco heritage is preserved at the Tobacco Farm Life Museum in Kenly. It provides a monument to one of North Carolina’s most important industries.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 1, June 1991, p32-34, il
Full Text:
Record #:
31068
Author(s):
Abstract:
The nine-point, all practice method of growing tobacco has boosted per-acre income from less than $1000 to $2000 for farmers in Apex, North Carolina. The all practice system includes soil testing, top-soiling, rotation, use of drainage tile, proper use of terraces and/or strip cropping, subsoiling, careful selection of fertilizers, use of well-adapted varieties, and fumigation of nematode-infested soil.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35285
Abstract:
An excerpt from “A Narrative of the Life, Sufferings, and Escape of John Brown, a Fugitive Slave, now in England,” details the process of tobacco farming in North Carolina from a slave hand’s perspective.
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Record #:
35879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Countering the appeal of Jaws, the latest film beast offering chills, thrills, and spills, was Stanley’s story of the great white hog. It proved that these triple attraction factors were not necessary to generate a tantalizing tale.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p51, 63
Record #:
35908
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mentioned was Smoke to Gold, a book produced by a local junior historic club, the Skewarkians. Getting the spotlight, though, was their second literary endeavor, Weird Tales. Many of the tales told were the byproduct of club members interviewing residents of Martin County, living in towns like Bear Grass. Helping the book to live up to its name and claim were ghost stories, local superstitions, and folk medicine.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p16