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40 results for Tobacco industry
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Record #:
778
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The Triangle (Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill) tobacco industry is known for its humid auctions and its colorful auctioneers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 34, Aug 1992, p6-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1032
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Biotechnological research with tobacco plants can provide an alternative market for North Carolina's tobacco farmers as well as cheaper drugs used in the treatment of cancer and cheaper foods for consumers.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 14, Apr 1993, p9, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1116
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A number of factors make North Carolina ports attractive to the importers and exporters of tobacco, so the volume of the leaf moved through these ports is considerable.
Source:
Cargo (NoCar HE 554 N8 C36x), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Summer 1993, p8-11
Record #:
1131
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A series of articles discusses tobacco's impact on North Carolina's and the U.S. economy, the flue-curing process, and the prognosis for tobacco's future.
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North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , June 1993, p1-4, por
Record #:
1186
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Albert Monk III is CEO of Farmville-based Monk-Austin, Inc., the fourth-largest tobacco processing company in the United States.
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Record #:
1198
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The Friends of Tobacco, a group of farmers, businessmen, legislators, and other tobacco advocates in the state, argues that smoking doesn't cause cancer and that the tobacco industry is being discriminated against.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 33, Aug 1993, p10-11, por Periodical Website
Record #:
1258
Abstract:
In this special advertising section, the Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina discusses the economic impact of the state's tobacco industry, stating that it generated $14 billion, some 20 percent of the state's economic activity, in 1992.
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Record #:
1870
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RJ Reynolds Tobacco International Inc. purchased another plant in the former Soviet Union, bringing to five the number of cigarette manufacturing plants owned by the company here. RJR's international division is far outselling the domestic division.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 9, Sept 1994, p59, il
Record #:
1944
Abstract:
Jim Johnston, chairman of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, is one spokesman for the tobacco industry who uses a conciliatory approach when dealing with tobacco critics.
Record #:
4418
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At the start of the 20th-century, three industries were gaining prominence -- tobacco, textiles, and furniture. Each made its influence felt in a different geographic location. Tobacco was the Coastal Plain's big moneymaker. Two hundred textile plants spurred growth in the Piedmont, encouraging farmers to grow more cotton. Furniture factories developed in the foothills, near their source of raw materials.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p23-25, il
Record #:
12207
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accounting for the majority of farm income within Pitt County, tobacco farming has sustained the community since 1725. Selling more flue-cured tobacco than any other county in the United States, Pitt County merchants established a market in 1891 from which to sell their goods. Initially, a one warehouse operation, membership in the Greenville Market grew to 31 different auctioneers, who, as of 1956, sold 97,367,576 pounds of tobacco, 57,161,694 pounds of which was grown locally.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 10, Oct 1957, p15-18, il
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Record #:
12607
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Richard J. Reynolds is an initial member of the NORTH CAROLINA magazine Business Hall of Fame. He was the founder of the RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company. Among its famous products were Prince Albert pipe tobacco and perhaps the most famous cigarette of all time - Camel.
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Record #:
12937
Abstract:
Oxford native Michael Cutts out chanted forty-eight other professional tobacco auctioneers to win the 1988 World Tobacco Auctioneering Championship held in Danville, North Carolina.
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Record #:
13139
Abstract:
North Carolina is the leading industrial state of the southeast with both the number of industrial worker and in industrial production. From the beginning, North Carolinians have adapted new ideas to the needs of the state with such endeavors as railway promotion and the home-grown industry in tobacco, textiles, and furniture.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 16, Dec 1955, p10-14, f
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Record #:
13266
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parker examines the manufacturing aspects of the tobacco industry in North Carolina, where companies like RJ Reynolds and Philip Morris are spending large sums of money to stay competitive in this highly profitable industry.
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