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11 results for Tobacco curing
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Record #:
1131
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Abstract:
A series of articles discusses tobacco's impact on North Carolina's and the U.S. economy, the flue-curing process, and the prognosis for tobacco's future.
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North Carolina State Economist (NoCar HD 1401 T34), Vol. Issue , June 1993, p1-4, por
Record #:
10613
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Abstract:
According to Joseph Robert's THE STORY OF TOBACCO IN AMERICA, methods for curing the golden leaf have changed through the years, but a barn of some type has been central to the process from the very beginning. Log-constructed tobacco curing barns were widely used in North Carolina from the 1600s well into the 20th century, even as curing methods changed from wood fires to oil and gas furnaces in the 1940s and 1950s. By the 1960s, new barn construction was modeled after modern stick-built homes, including electric furnaces for curing, and the old log barns, dilapidated from neglect, began to slowly disappear.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p12-13, il
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Record #:
15366
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Forrest Smith of Kinston developed a device to expedite and reduce the risks of tobacco curing. Traditionally tobacco curing involved the tedious task of watching over fires built in tobacco barns. Smith's invention involved a tank with oil burners and thermostat to regulate temperature that cured tobacco faster and more evenly. He planned to install trial systems in fifteen counties before expanding his company the following year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 1, June 1935, p2, il
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Record #:
31481
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North Carolina flue-cured tobacco growers can save millions of dollars this summer by making their curing barns more energy efficient. This estimate is from the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service, which conducted energy audits of hundreds of curing barns in the last two years. This article describes the study and provides recommendations from agricultural specialists.
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Record #:
31533
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Studies conducted at North Carolina State University indicate that wood can be used as the sole curing fuel for bulk tobacco barns. Tobacco uses roughly one half of North Carolina’s agricultural energy, excluding livestock. Meanwhile, it has been estimated that North Carolina forests annually produce more than enough wood to cure the total crop.
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Record #:
31562
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A North Carolina State University study examined bulk curers on twenty-four farms in Red Springs of Robeson County to determine whether a load control program would adversely affect tobacco production and farmers’ attitudes. The study found that tobacco is completely unharmed when cured in bulk barns where the fans are automatically turned off for brief periods when demand for electricity is highest.
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Record #:
31563
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More than half of North Carolina’s huge flue-cured tobacco crop is now cured in bulk barns. This milestone was reached in 1977 and the trend toward bulk barns is expected to continue. The main reason farmers have switched to bulk barns is to save labor, as well as energy.
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Record #:
31585
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Abstract:
Off-and-on operation of the fans on bulk tobacco barns can reduce the barns’ power consumption without damaging the tobacco or extending the time required to cure it. That conclusion was made from the results of field tests at tobacco farms across Eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1977, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31630
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preliminary experimental findings indicate that bulk tobacco barns can be used successfully with off-and-on operation of their circulation systems without harming the cured leaf. The “bad” news is that the results will not be conclusive until after the growing season this year. Tests are being conducted by North Carolina State University agricultural engineers at fifteen farms in eleven North Carolina counties.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Sept 1976, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31649
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina tobacco farmers are finding themselves between a rock and a hard place as they face an unexpected cost problem in the operation of mechanized bulk curing barns. The farmers’ concern is shared by the state’s power suppliers because the problem relates to the electricity needed to operate the curers. North Carolina State University agricultural engineers plan to begin experimenting soon to find ways of making bulk barns more energy efficient.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35572
Author(s):
Abstract:
Almost seventy percent of tobacco farmed in the US coming from Eastern NC. From that, the state’s number one cash crop well earned its king status. Developing more mechanically sophisticated means of curing, as well as replacing the longstanding human labor with machinery, just made the hard earned goal easier to accomplish.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p7