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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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26 results for Alternative energy sources
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Record #:
404
Abstract:
The North Carolina Alternative Energy Corporation was created to coordinate between utility companies and suppliers and residents who desire on site alternative energy sources.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Winter 1980, p5-11, il
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Record #:
19726
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A Durham-based company is building a new green vehicle. The organic transit business is assembling a new vehicle called the ELF (Electric, Light, and Fun). An ELF is a hybrid bicycle and electric car powered either by pedaling or the solar panel on its roof.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 22, May 2013, p15, 17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27689
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Nuclear energy has proven to be a safe, clean, and reliable alternative form of energy. Nuclear plants in North Carolina have been successful, but there is still some resistance to using nuclear power.
Record #:
30186
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North Carolina has become an important player in renewable energy, with solar and wind farms and other projects attracting billions of dollars. The investment reflects state law requiring utilities to lessen their reliance on coal, natural gas and nuclear sources.
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Record #:
30815
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French Broad EMC, an electric cooperative serving four western North Carolina counties and two in Tennessee, is a partner in the first rural wind power education program east of the Mississippi River. The project will install small wind turbines at three schools in Madison County and develop an alternative-energy curriculum for public schools as part of an effort to introduce wind power to rural communities.
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Record #:
30990
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Ground-source heat pumps, are environmentally-friendly, efficient systems which draw from the earth’s temperature underground to heat and cool interior spaces. Residents of Haywood County and Randolph County, North Carolina describe how the systems work, installation, and costs compared to conventional air-source electric heat pumps.
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Record #:
31430
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Loblolly pine and sycamore show the most promise so far of trees that might be grown in North Carolina specifically for energy. Dr. Douglas J. Frederick of North Carolina State University spent five years evaluating tree growth and energy potential. This article discusses Frederick’s project and the potential to establish experimental wood-energy plantations.
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Record #:
31502
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In this article, geologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill discuss their research on the state’s peat resources and other alternative fuels. They have been conducting a study to inventory the total peat reserves and find out exactly how much peat North Carolina has. The geologists are also researching more productive ways of extracting synthetic gas and oil from Eastern shale rock, and exploring the use of underground methane gas and sandstone brine.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p10-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
31521
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Wood is gaining a place as an industrial fuel in North Carolina. The state’s huge brick industry is following the lead of the wood products industry in converting from gas or oil to wood. Studies are also looking at the possibility of using wood in the generation of electricity.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Feb 1980, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31523
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North Carolina voters will have a diversified field of twenty-five candidates to choose from May 6 when the Democratic, Republican, and Libertarian Parties select their candidates for various statewide offices. This article presents the candidates’ biographies and views on critical issues pertaining to fuel and alternative energy sources.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 4, Apr 1980, p8-25, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31533
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Studies conducted at North Carolina State University indicate that wood can be used as the sole curing fuel for bulk tobacco barns. Tobacco uses roughly one half of North Carolina’s agricultural energy, excluding livestock. Meanwhile, it has been estimated that North Carolina forests annually produce more than enough wood to cure the total crop.
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Record #:
31534
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North Carolina electric cooperatives could be awarded federal funds for preliminary work on a demonstration peat-fired generating plant under legislation adopted recently by Congress. The legislation allocates funds for first-stage design and engineering on such a plant, which would be the first such facility in the United States. The proposed demonstration plant would provide vital information regarding the practical approaches to tapping this energy source and the environmental effects of harvesting and burning peat.
Record #:
31532
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Watauga County has been designated by the United States Department of Energy as the nation’s first energy-conservation and development area. If the county achieves the program’s goal, it will serve as a model for the country of how areas can become less dependent on foreign energy sources. Several grants will be used to install wind generators, increase energy efficiency, and provide training for high school teachers on energy problems and alternative energy sources.
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Record #:
31547
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North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations are seeking funding sources for construction of a peat-fired generating plant near Creswell in Washington County. The plans include a preliminary feasibility study of the proposed plant, which would be the first of its kind in the country. With North Carolina’s extensive peat reserves, the proposed plant could supply all of the state’s energy needs for at least twenty-three years.
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Record #:
31556
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Researchers at North Carolina State University are gathering data to assess the biomass and energy values of the South’s existing forests. Forest biomass is a proven fuel source that could have substantial impact on North Carolina’s energy problem. Several industries, such as textile and brick plants are already relying on wood for an energy source.
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