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7 results for Tobacco--Barns
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Record #:
20138
Abstract:
In the 1950s, tobacco barns dotted North Carolina with nearly half a million locations statewide. Made for curing the state's top commodity, today only around 50,000 of these barns still stand.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 3, Aug 2013, p124-126, 128, 130, 132-133, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
24108
Author(s):
Abstract:
A coalition of groups launched an ambitious undertaking to codify tobacco barns in Madison County, recording the architecture and objects left behind in the barns.
Record #:
31306
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mail Pouch ad campaign dated back to 1897, when Aaron and Samuel Bloch decided to test the market for a by-product produced in their Wheeling, West Virginia stogie plant. Farmers helped to advertise the experimental chewing tobacco on their barns, in exchange for tobacco as payment. After the program ended, the painted barns discontinued and they are now recognized as a vanishing American folk art.
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Record #:
31481
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Abstract:
North Carolina flue-cured tobacco growers can save millions of dollars this summer by making their curing barns more energy efficient. This estimate is from the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service, which conducted energy audits of hundreds of curing barns in the last two years. This article describes the study and provides recommendations from agricultural specialists.
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Record #:
31563
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than half of North Carolina’s huge flue-cured tobacco crop is now cured in bulk barns. This milestone was reached in 1977 and the trend toward bulk barns is expected to continue. The main reason farmers have switched to bulk barns is to save labor, as well as energy.
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Record #:
31585
Author(s):
Abstract:
Off-and-on operation of the fans on bulk tobacco barns can reduce the barns’ power consumption without damaging the tobacco or extending the time required to cure it. That conclusion was made from the results of field tests at tobacco farms across Eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1977, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31630
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preliminary experimental findings indicate that bulk tobacco barns can be used successfully with off-and-on operation of their circulation systems without harming the cured leaf. The “bad” news is that the results will not be conclusive until after the growing season this year. Tests are being conducted by North Carolina State University agricultural engineers at fifteen farms in eleven North Carolina counties.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Sept 1976, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website