NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Barns
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4242
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, every tobacco farm had one - a pack house, or barn, a one-and-a-half to two-story building, where cured tobacco was brought for grading and tying before going to market. Today, replaced by mechanization and modern bulk curing barns, pack houses are reminders of bygone days. They dot the countryside with their leaning, weathered, sometimes ivy-covered, walls.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 8, Aug 1999, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
10613
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to Joseph Robert's THE STORY OF TOBACCO IN AMERICA, methods for curing the golden leaf have changed through the years, but a barn of some type has been central to the process from the very beginning. Log-constructed tobacco curing barns were widely used in North Carolina from the 1600s well into the 20th century, even as curing methods changed from wood fires to oil and gas furnaces in the 1940s and 1950s. By the 1960s, new barn construction was modeled after modern stick-built homes, including electric furnaces for curing, and the old log barns, dilapidated from neglect, began to slowly disappear.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p12-13, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29708
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Appalachian Barn Alliance’s project to document the historic barns of Madison County, North Carolina is often inspired by old photos of the daily activities on mountain farms. Photos show that the oldest surviving barns once had very different features and building materials, and reflected the simple building technology of the times.
Full Text:
Record #:
29757
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first century of European immigrant history in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina was without commercial tobacco, thus requiring no specialized barn. As settlement came to the area, farm families built barns to house their livestock. Now becoming more rare, these pre-tobacco livestock barns can be spotted by their log crib and steep gable roofs covered in tin.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
32165
Abstract:
This is a nostalgic essay about old Eastern North Carolina barns and how these structures represent the original rural culture in the South. Anecdotes and photographs depict the function and value of barns in historic rural life.
Source:
Record #:
35502
Author(s):
Abstract:
In their years of disuse and disregard, barns were being reclaimed by nature. As the author insisted, though, this remnant of the former economic staple for much of NC had elements that worms could not consume. There was the barns’ capacity to well up memories of the agrarian life. Also was this reminder: the important role barns played in rural life and many small towns.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p38-39
Record #:
35808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Testament of the once prevalent agrarian culture was the building staple of family farms. Attesting its importance in family farm life were its many purposes, mostly practical. One not prosaic to the author was its ability, especially for children, to exude a mystique. This quality, helping rural life to possess a rustic charm, the author suggested also contributed to their lengthy history, continuing in the US through immigrants such as Scots and Swedes. It’s one that has generated long standing associations with other groups such as Mennonites and Amish.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p38-39