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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Farm buildings
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Record #:
4242
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, every tobacco farm had one - a pack house, or barn, a one-and-a-half to two-story building, where cured tobacco was brought for grading and tying before going to market. Today, replaced by mechanization and modern bulk curing barns, pack houses are reminders of bygone days. They dot the countryside with their leaning, weathered, sometimes ivy-covered, walls.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 31 Issue 8, Aug 1999, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
23821
Abstract:
The fledgling group Winter Green grows winter-hardy produce from fall through early spring in structures called hoophouses and lowtunnels.
Source:
Record #:
32165
Abstract:
This is a nostalgic essay about old Eastern North Carolina barns and how these structures represent the original rural culture in the South. Anecdotes and photographs depict the function and value of barns in historic rural life.
Source:
Record #:
35419
Author(s):
Abstract:
What is regarded as newsworthy, whether personally or in the pages of Wilmington DE’s Morning News, was relayed in this quintet of stories shared by writers native and not. Newsworthy topics included buildings and an electric cooperative with personal historic value and “fish out of water” style experiences on a bench and in a Central NC town.
Source:
Record #:
35502
Author(s):
Abstract:
In their years of disuse and disregard, barns were being reclaimed by nature. As the author insisted, though, this remnant of the former economic staple for much of NC had elements that worms could not consume. There was the barns’ capacity to well up memories of the agrarian life. Also was this reminder: the important role barns played in rural life and many small towns.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p38-39
Record #:
35693
Author(s):
Abstract:
Homes gained value in ways that couldn’t be defined by the year of construction or a place in a historical house directory. For the author, there’s no place like home was proven in porches as well as peepholes, hand rived shingles as well as shake roofs. From these discoveries, one can gain a new perspective on the old days.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p27
Subject(s):
Record #:
35808
Author(s):
Abstract:
Testament of the once prevalent agrarian culture was the building staple of family farms. Attesting its importance in family farm life were its many purposes, mostly practical. One not prosaic to the author was its ability, especially for children, to exude a mystique. This quality, helping rural life to possess a rustic charm, the author suggested also contributed to their lengthy history, continuing in the US through immigrants such as Scots and Swedes. It’s one that has generated long standing associations with other groups such as Mennonites and Amish.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p38-39