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15 results for Small towns--North Carolina
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Record #:
17954
Abstract:
According to the 1950 North Carolina census, there are more than 400 small communities of less than 2,500 population in the state. Almost one out of four city dwellers in North Carolina live in one of these small towns. They are now sharing problems of growth and development that the larger cities are facing.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 24 Issue 6, Mar 1958, p1-5, f
Record #:
23057
Abstract:
Ten southern towns located less than ninety minutes from major cities provide small-town charm and an opportunity for weekend trips. Included in the list is Davidson, North Carolina, located on Lake Norman and just thirty minutes north of Charlotte.
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Record #:
23572
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From small town charm to contested history, Waxhaw has much to offer for those who desire to escape the bustling city life of Charlotte. With the rising population, the town faces challenges. Residents resist change but, but must find a way to provide for the newcomers.
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Record #:
35310
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This collection of recollections featured topics such as the value of Easter indicated in new dresses and prized foal’s name; extended family, such as cousins; and higher education attained in a community college that is now a university.
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Record #:
35419
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What is regarded as newsworthy, whether personally or in the pages of Wilmington DE’s Morning News, was relayed in this quintet of stories shared by writers native and not. Newsworthy topics included buildings and an electric cooperative with personal historic value and “fish out of water” style experiences on a bench and in a Central NC town.
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Record #:
35622
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Owen’s return to his hometown revealed little had changed during his years away in college working on a Bachelor’s degree and present work with a Master’s. One illustration was daily activity at the local general store. As he discovered, it was still a site for yarns, but not of the sewing circle sort: it was the creative license a narrator used to stitch together a tale.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Aug 1977, p33-36
Record #:
35626
Author(s):
Abstract:
A visit with Newman and Geneva Levi of Green River revealed much about the lifeways of small towns and their people. As evident by this couple, life was still often defined by wood burning stoves and canned vegetables. It was also marked by talks after the time of day still known as daydown, talk including tales of outsiders who didn’t find their visits so pleasant.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p26-28, 45
Record #:
35635
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Abstract:
The title, echoing a shout by her fellow schoolchildren, hinted at the poverty stricken circumstances revealed in her clothes. Christmas Day, though, was an occasion to forget all she lacked, because of presents given by relatives in California. The present most cherished was a copy of Louisa May Alcott, Little Women; she could relate all too well to its main characters, the Marsh family.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 6, Dec 1977, p8-10, 18
Record #:
36308
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Abstract:
For Henderson, the word roses can remind natives of a common surname in town. Two native sons most associated with the name: Charlie Rose, longtime host of the TV program “CBS This Morning”; Paul Rose, founder of the department store that opened in 1915. The word can also prompt reminders of Henderson’s blossoming economic development, in establishment of businesses like Iams Pet Foods and a Durham semiconductor firm, Semprius.
Record #:
38118
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Abstract:
The small-town persona of the past included Main Street as the main street and Bijou Theatre. For Columbia, the cinema on the corner of Main and Elm Streets provided a major source of entertainment and helped define the way of life in the small town. Seven days a week, three times a day, and for nearly fifty years, the Columbia Theatre became a landmark in the community and backdrop for many locals on life’s stage.
Record #:
38231
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many small towns in North Carolina are experiencing a crisis towns and cities are invulnerable to. Younger generations are moving out in search of better jobs; companies once occupational mainstays are closing; opportunities for infrastructure improvement and economic recovery are lost. For their citizens, the toll can be seen in skyrocketing rates of poverty, disability, overdose, and addiction. Efforts to combat this crisis include Governor Roy Cooper’s Hometown Strong. This program is designed to rejuvenate downtowns, upskill workers, provide small business loans, and enhance high speed Internet connections.
Record #:
38262
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Abstract:
Mount Airy vacillates cashing in on a connection to Andy Griffith and the TV series the town inspired. Pride in their native son is displayed in facilities such as the Andy Griffith Museum and Mount Airy Visitors Center. A preference to cleave to the town’s identity is expressed by younger generations who want Mount Airy to be just Mount Airy. Willingness to heighten a connection to the classic comedy is reflected in Mayberry Consignments and Mayberry Days.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p86-88, 90, 92-94, 96 Periodical Website
Record #:
39589
Author(s):
Abstract:
The closing of Eden’s MillerCoors negatively impacted the town’s other large business, Morehead Memorial Hospital. Its closing served as a reminder of factors that leave towns like Eden and its rural Rockingham County economically vulnerable, such as brain drain and the rural-urban divide. Believed reasons why it closed included Anheuser-Busch In-Bev’s purchased SAB-Miller not having competition. Believed reasons why it remains closed includes the Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina favoring cities.
Record #:
39528
Author(s):
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Despite its explosive population and job growth, Winterville retains its small-town charm and value for local traditions. Sam Jones, a fourth-generation barbecue business owner, reflects the town’s value for local traditions. Winterville’s small-town charm has generated its reputation as a “safe clean-cut place to settle down.”
Record #:
39920
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Abstract:
The setting in Shelia Turnage’s novels proves that facts from a writer’s life always find their way into his or her fiction. Tupelo’s Landing resembles the town where Turnage lives and any small town in the South. Evidence includes a list of lines quoted from her Dale and Mo mystery series.
Source:
Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2015 , p50-52, 54