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15 results for Films
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Record #:
16253
Abstract:
A Singing Stream is the first film in the American Traditional Culture Series to chronicle 20th-century African-American history through the musical traditions of one family. It presents the Landis family of rural Granville County and suggests the cultural resources with which they have faced historical changes.
Record #:
16296
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Over the past two decades Tom Davenport has established himself as one of the most important and successful folklore filmmakers active in America. His finest films are all essentially autobiographies of people and cultures whose stories they tell. This uniquely autobiographical approach is apparent in his North Carolina films.
Record #:
20323
Abstract:
Summer tourists to North Carolina are pleased to spot staged scenes for high-profile movies. Cities and villages such as Southport, Wilmington, Durham, and Rodanthe are popular spots for transformation into some of the most popular recent films.
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Record #:
27590
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The forthcoming film Joe, directed by David Gordon Green, has deep roots in North Carolina. North Carolina native and Duke professor Gary Hawkins adapted the screen play for the film and was the teacher of Green at the North Carolina School of the Arts. Hawkins discusses the process of adapting Larry Brown’s novel, working on the film, and working with Green.
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Record #:
27745
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Saleem Reshamwala is an independent filmmaker and the owner of the Durham video production company KidEthnic. Reshamwala’s latest project is titled Dreaming Durham which will have Durham residents ask bystanders what they would like to see on the city’s vacant lots. The final film will then digitally illustrate these requests on top of the images of the empty lots as a commentary on the extreme change happening in Durham. Reshamwala is known for collaborating, his “weirdness,” and his passion.
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Record #:
27827
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The state of film production in North Carolina is getting better. Direct spending on film in the state is expected to be almost six times what it was in 2010 (75 million to 450 million). Major films like The Hunger Games, Iron Man 3 and TV shows Homeland, Revenge, and Hart of Dixie are currently filming in North Carolina or plan to film in North Carolina in the next year. Wilmington and Charlotte are major film production areas. The success of the industry is credited to Governor Perdue and the legislature for offering new film incentives in 2011 which have attracted new films.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 52, December 2011, p21-22 Periodical Website
Record #:
27861
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Carboro drummer Lee Waters is working on scoring music for Andy Warhol’s silent films. Waters tells the story of how he became involved in the project and his group’s journey to Paris to record for the project. Waters career as a drummer and his bandmates careers are also detailed.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 7, February 2010, p40 Periodical Website
Record #:
28140
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Locals from Durham remember the filming of Bull Durham. Local residents who served as extras, an audio assistant, and a local bar owner whose bar was in the film remember the filming of the movie. The weather, a day with actor Tim Robbins, stolen memorabilia, long filming days, and parking issues are all shared in stories about the filming of the movie.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28141
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With the twentieth anniversary of the film Bull Durham arriving, the author can’t understand why Durham, its residents, and baseball fans love the film. The author describes why the film inaccurately portrays minor league baseball, why it is an unoriginal, poorly cast, and poorly written movie, and how the film did not represent life in Durham.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 27, July 2008, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28842
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Ramin Bahrani is a North Carolina-born filmmaker who has garnered an extraordinary amount of international acclaim. His latest film, Goodbye Solo, reflects Bahrani’s experience in Winston-Salem, and the influence of immigrant cultures.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 10 Issue 5, May 2009, p40-41, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29042
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More than thirty years after its publication, Margaret Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, has a new episodic adaptation. The adaptation was filmed primarily in Durham, and includes a significant scene in front of Duke Chapel’s iconic bell tower. The film has stirred much controversy, raising serious questions about society, power, and politics.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 19, May 2017, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36036
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The real life of East Carolina University alum Ron Clark would become a reel event through a TV movie, with Matthew Perry playing the title role. As for other reel life connections to ECU, mentioned was the movie being produced about the 1970 Marshall University plane crash.
Record #:
36144
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The base known familiarly as Cherry Point has followed a longstanding military tradition for North Carolina, with Marines on coastal duty since 1777. Cherry Point’s history included its founding, attributed to the Quantico, Virginia base being deemed inadequate. Also noted in its profile: base name’s source; originally designated location; role in World War II; inclusion of female Marines; and celebrity pilots such as Tyrone Power.
Record #:
36223
Abstract:
Some were real life converted to reel life, such as Philadelphia (1993) and A Time to Kill (1996). Others were based on novels: Inherit the Wind (1958) and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). The remaining six were also fictitious accounts of the justice system. Whatever the plot’s source, they offered insightful and entertaining portrayals of life from both sides of the counsellor’s table.
Record #:
38118
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The small-town persona of the past included Main Street as the main street and Bijou Theatre. For Columbia, the cinema on the corner of Main and Elm Streets provided a major source of entertainment and helped define the way of life in the small town. Seven days a week, three times a day, and for nearly fifty years, the Columbia Theatre became a landmark in the community and backdrop for many locals on life’s stage.