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12 results for African American musicians
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Record #:
1660
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Mebane native Odell Thompson, North Carolina's last active black banjoist, was killed on April 28, 1994, when he was struck by a car. He had performed earlier that day at the Merle Watson Memorial Festival.
Record #:
3309
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Frank Johnson's brass band was the best-known musical group in the state from 1830 to 1870. A former slave, he organized a band that traveled the state to play for plantation aristocracy and public events.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 11, Apr 1989, p8-9, il
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Record #:
5579
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Joe and Odell Thompson of Alamance County received a 1991 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for continuing the African-American stringband tradition. The cousins play banjo and fiddle together, a combination that once provided much of the South's dance music.
Record #:
16253
Abstract:
A Singing Stream is the first film in the American Traditional Culture Series to chronicle 20th-century African-American history through the musical traditions of one family. It presents the Landis family of rural Granville County and suggests the cultural resources with which they have faced historical changes.
Record #:
16149
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African Americans found musical and expressive freedom following the Civil War when they began to build their own churches. Hymnals merged with traditional African songs and created a strong new genre of spiritual expression. Some of the state's most prominent black musicians included Shirley Caesar, The Bright Moon Quartet, and the Golden Echoes.
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Record #:
16155
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Military branches still racially segregated troops during World War II but the Navy decided to break with traditional roles for black seamen when it formed the B-1 Band. The state's best black musicians comprised this musical troop which would be the first time black seamen served in any other naval position outside of the galleys.
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Record #:
28912
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William Grant Still was the most celebrated African American classical composer in the United States, and had a profound influence on musicians. In honor of his one-hundredth birthday, arts organizations throughout North Carolina are celebrating Still and his music. The Eastern Music Festival featured lectures and performances of Still’s works.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Summer/Fall 1995, p1-3, por
Record #:
28964
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Dom Flemons, Kaia Kater, and Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton are among a handful of people of color who are asserting their rightful place in folk, bluegrass, and old-time music. The three musicians recognize the centuries-long impact of racial discrimination in music. Their performance in Raleigh will spotlight the African roots of the banjo, and feature music and songs which use rhetoric as a way to break barriers and open minds.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Feb 2017, p16-17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29018
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George Clinton, North Carolina native and legend of P-Funk music, is a headliner at the Art of Cool Festival in Durham this weekend. Clinton has been a uniting figure for generations, with his music empowering African Americans to fight for social and racial equality. Most of the performers at this year’s festival were strongly influenced by Clinton’s music.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 15, April 2017, p28-29, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31582
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Eddie “Doc” Flamingo is a disc jockey in Mount Olive, North Carolina. For over thirty years, Flamingo has traveled throughout the South performing and playing music records. Flamingo discusses being an African American music entertainer for diverse audiences, social values, and different attitudes about race.
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Record #:
36425
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Article on Frankie and Doug Quimby, of the Georgia Sea Island Singers, who put on workshops during the Tar Hill Junior Historian Awards Day 1985. They share and recreate the Afro-American heritage of music, dance and storytelling preserved on the sea islands off the Georgia coast.
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Record #:
39442
Abstract:
Ferguson reviews the co-authored guidebook about music in eastern North Carolina, focusing on the vibrant traditions and present-day celebrations of African American music.