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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Banjoists
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Record #:
1660
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mebane native Odell Thompson, North Carolina's last active black banjoist, was killed on April 28, 1994, when he was struck by a car. He had performed earlier that day at the Merle Watson Memorial Festival.
Record #:
21817
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jens Kruger and his brother Uwe grew up in Switzerland. He recounts growing up in a musical home and the discovery when they were teenagers of a recording from a place they had never heard of (North Carolina) and the two players, Earl Scruggs and Doc Watson. He goes on to relate coming to North Carolina in 1982, meeting Bill Monroe, playing at the Grand Ole Opry, and in 1997, he and Uwe played at MerleFest. Today, the brothers live in the state and travel this country and the world playing the music they discovered as teenagers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p124-126, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28541
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditional music in North Carolina has been highlighted for excellence and authenticity for years. The history of traditional, old-time, and bluegrass music in Western North Carolina's mountains is detailed. Notable musicians, revolutionary playing styles and innovations, and the music’s origins in Africa, England, Ireland, and Scotland are noted.
Record #:
30644
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earl Scruggs pioneered, perfected and popularized a three-fingers banjo-picking style that came to be known around the world as Scruggs-style picking. He passed away in 2013 at age 88, but he lives on through his many recordings and a new museum in Shelby, North Carolina called the Earl Scruggs Center. This article provides a biography of Scruggs, and some of the galleries and exhibits showcased at the new museum.
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Record #:
36843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Inspired by the banjo-playing of his mother, Ward developed a two-finger banjo picking in his own style, creating his own unique sound.