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12 results for Traditional music
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Record #:
22091
Abstract:
This article lists a few of the towns around the state where a person can hear and also play traditional, old-time music--Elkin, Kinston, and Raleigh.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p36, 38-39, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27762
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Hillsborough resident and noted bluesman Ironing Board Sam has been given the opportunity to play music again. Samuel Moore’s history and his influence on music in America and the blues is recorded. Moore has been given the opportunity to perform again after Hillsborough’s The Music Maker Relief Foundation has provided assistance to him and re-released his record. The group is dedicated to preserving and promoting all forms of traditional music.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 10, March 2013, p24-25 Periodical Website
Record #:
27847
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The Shakori Hills GrassRoots Festival in Chatham County is raising money to buy the land it currently leases. The nonprofit that produces the festival cannot afford the land but does not want to leave. The festival is growing each year and its lease is almost up. The problem is explored and compared with other national festivals who have experienced similar issues.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 6, February 2010, p39 Periodical Website
Record #:
27878
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North Carolina residents gather at the weekly Picking & Grinning at Schley Grange Hall outside Hillsborough. The two-hour gathering has been going on for ten years and brings residents together to hear, sing, and play gospel and country music. The gatherings sometimes have as many as two hundred attend and all are invited to participate. The sessions are important to members of the community, especially older individuals and celebrate their musical heritage.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 10, March 2010, p22-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
27897
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The Black Banjo Gathering conference was held in Boone, NC recently. The gathering unites musicians, scholars, and enthusiasts to celebrate the banjos tradition and recognize it’s African, Afro-Caribbean, and Africa-American origins. The small gathering included workshops, concerts, panel discussions, lectures, and parties.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p25 Periodical Website
Record #:
28358
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North Carolina’s musicians who play a modern version of traditional music are top sellers nationwide this year. The music’s timeless quality and enduring appeal is a reminder to listeners of their personal connections with music. This music connects families and multiple generations and the universities in the state frequently fund study of folk and bluegrass music. Finally, the state’s reputation for producing quality traditional music and the high likelihood that it will be heard anywhere people go contributes to the music’s recent and lasting success.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 51, December 2007, p36-37 Periodical Website
Record #:
28372
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Abstract:
Ballad singer-storyteller Sheila Adams Barnhill discusses the importance of storytelling through song in Madison County, NC. Barnhill is a seventh-generation singer-storyteller and shares how she learned the craft from her family members and the reputation of Madison County as the place of a rich singing-storytelling tradition. Barnhill has won several awards for her talent.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 35, August-September 1992, p8 Periodical Website
Record #:
28541
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Traditional music in North Carolina has been highlighted for excellence and authenticity for years. The history of traditional, old-time, and bluegrass music in Western North Carolina's mountains is detailed. Notable musicians, revolutionary playing styles and innovations, and the music’s origins in Africa, England, Ireland, and Scotland are noted.
Record #:
36845
Abstract:
The Cockman family performed gospel hymns for nearly 25 years; the traveled from Florida to New York performing for churches, festivals, weddings, funerals, and more. The family group also teaches others to play music and sing and have recorded their own albums.
Record #:
36516
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The Music Maker Relief Foundation (MMRF) has been helping musicians preserve Southern traditions that most of them learned to play by simply listening. It focuses on musician sustenance, musical development, and cultural access.
Record #:
35965
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For over ninety years, Julie Jarrell Lyons shared mountain folkways in the forms of singing, dancing, and telling tales.
Record #:
36355
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Scancarelli received the award for his behind the scenes work recording and promoting musical traditions. He led recording teams, took photos, wrote liner notes, created cover art, and distributed annual LP recordings on his own label.