NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


25 results for Storytellers
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
6232
Author(s):
Abstract:
Louise Anderson is a nationally known Afro-American storyteller whose tales have delighted listeners at festivals and stage appearances. Moffett discusses Anderson's evolution as a storyteller and elements of her art as contained in three characteristic tales. The North Carolina Arts Council honored her with the North Carolina Folk Heritage Award for 1993.
Record #:
8252
Abstract:
Storyteller Connie Regan-Blake of Asheville maintains a busy schedule, performing nationally and internationally and conducting workshops to teach others the art of telling stories. A visit to her cousin, who was working in a library, started Regan-Blake on her storytelling career. In 1975, the two women decided to tell stories full-time, and for the next three years they performed around the country. They eventually settled in Asheville where Regan-Blake met her future husband. In July, the National Storytelling Network presented her with the 2006 Oracle Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of her “sustained and exemplary contribution to storytelling in North America.”
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p97-98, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8254
Author(s):
Abstract:
Storyteller Willa Bingham writes most of her stories and poems or adapts material from library books. She has been developing her storytelling style since 1990 and performs over 150 times a year. She is a familiar face around North Carolina because of her weekend television show, Smart Start Kids, which is shown on WRAL-TV and rebroadcast on UNC-TV. The show won an Emmy Award for best children's educational program in the Midsouth region.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p102-103, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8255
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jerry Wolfe, an elder in the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, has spent many years storytelling and promoting Cherokee culture. His stories are drawn from his own experiences, including World War II and the Job Corps program, and from Cherokee animal tales. He is well-known as an expert on Indian stickball and as a carver of special sticks used in the game. He received the North Carolina Arts Council Heritage Award in 2003.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p104-105, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8253
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sheila Kay Adams grew up in Madison County in the small town of Sodom, a community famous for its ballad singers. She is a storyteller, writer, and seventh-generation singer. Her husband, Jim Taylor, builds dulcimers and arranges and produces music CDs of the old music. The couple spends about four months a year on the road performing the old songs and stories of the North Carolina mountains at storytelling festivals and concerts.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p100-101, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8258
Abstract:
Ron Jones, a past president of the North Carolina Storytelling Guild, comes from a family of storytellers and has been immersed in the oral tradition all of his life. His style is straightforward, but he also uses his guitar to weave music into the tales he tells. He holds a master's degree in library science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and worked twenty-two years in the Wake County Library System. Much of his storytelling has been connected with the Wake County Public Libraries and public schools. Now retired, he spends his time storytelling across North Carolina and in surrounding states.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p110-112, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8259
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mark Twain's stories and thoughtful insights have been resurrected in North Carolina by professional storyteller Dr. Marvin Cole, who is the image of the humorist when he performs. A rereading of Huckleberry Finn when Cole was president of Dekalb College in Georgia gave him the idea to take on the persona of Twain and bring his works to life. He performed his first show at age fifty-six and has gone on to perform at conferences, universities, and on Mississippi River riverboats.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
8260
Author(s):
Abstract:
His grandmother's insistence that the family make up skits, songs, and stories on beach vacations, instead of watching television and listening to the radio, influenced Wright Clarkson to become a professional storyteller. He taught school a while and had a telemarketing career; then he returned to teach in preschool where he began to tell stories. Five years ago, with the encouragement of his wife and friends, he became a full-time storyteller. \r\nClarkson discusses his career.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p114-115, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8257
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hickory resident Sylvia Payne, a professional storyteller and board member of the North Carolina Storytelling Guild, has been telling stories over thirty years. Payne travels the southeastern United States, presenting workshops and telling her stories at festivals, schools, colleges, and libraries. She is always collecting new material to add to her repertoire, which includes family and personal stories, historic legends, ghost stories, and folktales from other cultures.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p108-109, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8256
Author(s):
Abstract:
For over twenty years, Joan Leotta, of Calabash, was a well-known storyteller in the Mid-Atlantic and New England states and was a featured storyteller at the White House, the Kennedy Center, and the Smithsonian Institution. She not only tells stories but performs them as well, becoming individual characters in her award-winning one-woman show, Time Traveler.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
10168
Author(s):
Abstract:
Harrison profiles Donald Davis of Ocracoke, perhaps the best-known storyteller in America today. He was born in Waynesville into a family of storytellers. After graduating from Davidson College and the Duke Divinity School, he served as a Methodist minister for twenty years. He gave it up in 1988 to pursue storytelling full-time and now gives over 300 performances a year.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
16243
Author(s):
Abstract:
The flamboyant, swaggering frontier tall-tale tellers and local colorists of American literature were invariably skilled narrators. The comic adventure tales and exaggerated lies chronicling outlandish deeds of fishing, hunting, and fighting flourished in the new country. These stories captured something of the exuberant national character and gave verbal expression to the wild individuality of the American frontier.
Subject(s):
Record #:
5300
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jones discusses storytelling in North Carolina, the transmission of traditional tales, and a number of storytellers, including three who are internationally known: Ray Hicks, Jackie Torrence, and Donald Davis.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
30900
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brenda Gilbert and Jan Schmidt co-founded the Storytelling Arts Center of the Southeast to bring diverse cultures together in sharing their storytelling traditions. They also started the Storytelling Festival of Carolina, a spring event that brings national and regional storytellers together in Scotland County. Stories included history, genealogy, spirituality, and traditions of Lumbee Indians, African Americans, and European immigrants.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
35195
Author(s):
Abstract:
Silas McDowell collected these two stories, “A Forced Marriage” and “Circumstantial Evidence,” from Mrs. Nancy McEntire, the woman whom he boarded with in Morganton, NC.