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36 results for Milling, Marla Hardee
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Record #:
7214
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Using the alphabet, the writers describe twenty-six interesting places to visit during the summer months. These include the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Bost Grist Mill, Charlotte Trolley Museum, Doughton Park, and the Zebulon Latimer House Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p78-84, 86-88, 90-92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7257
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Toymaker Harold Garrison hand-carves old-time toys, like the hillbilly yo-yo and the gee haw whimmy diddle. Garrison is in his eighty-second year, stands 6'10,” and still lives at his old homeplace in Weaverville. His carving titled “Government Machines” earned him a spot in the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p74-77, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7336
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Milling discusses the circuitous path that eventually led woodcarver Dennis Ruane and his wife to settle in downtown Waynesville. Ruane earned degrees from the universities of West Virginia and Wisconsin and was working on his doctorate when he decided to pursue his love of carving. He had never taken an art class before. He lived in Pennsylvania and Maryland before friends recommended that he explore the artistic happenings in western North Carolina. The family came to North Carolina in 1999, and in 2000, opened Hardwood Gallery in Waynesville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p160-164, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7392
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Not yet thirty years of age, Joshua P. Warren of Asheville is an internationally known expert on things paranormal. He has authored eight books, written newspaper articles, and explored almost one thousand paranormal locations. He has seen an apparition only once. He is the founder and president of the League of Energy Materialization and Unexplained phenomena Research (L.E.M.U.R.). This team of researchers conducts investigations using high-tech devices, including electromagnetic field detection, infrared and ultraviolet photography, sub-sonic audio recording, and three-dimensional photography.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 5, Oct 2005, p148-150, 152, 154, 156, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7612
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Bakers start working at 3 A.M., and the bakers at Whitman's Bakery in Waynesville have been making pastries, breads and cookies for the last sixty years. The bakery opened in 1945 and still remains in its original location at 18 North Main Street. Now operated by a fourth-generation of the Whitman family, the bakery continues its legacy of fresh baked goods served with a personal touch.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p144-146, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7699
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Don Stevenson of Morganton builds birdhouses and feeders in his Fourth Creek Folk Art Studio. What sets his work apart from other birdhouse builders is the fact that his birdhouses are hand-sculpted, scaled reproductions of old buildings, barns, mountain cabins, and churches. His work draws raves from collectors, art critics, and book authors. His projects have included replicas of Paula Steichen Sandburg's goat barn in Henderson County and Payne's Chapel Methodist Church in Buncombe County.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p158-160, 162, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7707
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The Appalachian Archives at Mars Hill College contains a wide range of genealogical treasures. The majority of the collection focuses on families in western North Carolina. Other items include census records; a scrapbook on famed folk musician Bascom Lamar Lunsford; an extremely rare 1890s publication of the complete collection of the War of the Rebellion; and North Carolina newspapers on microfilm. The collection is expanding digitally to make the material accessible in the library or from home.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p104-106, 108, 110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7801
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Milling discusses the work and creations of Debbie Littledeer, a graduate of Mars Hill College, who creates silkscreens that feature Appalachian scenes--Blue Ridge Mountains, wildlife, trees, and flowers. Littledeer uses up to eighteen different colors in her limited edition prints, but blue and lavender are preferred. Milling describes the process for making a silkscreen.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p220-222, 224, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7954
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Milling discusses the work and creations of Asheville glass carver Charles Donaldson. Donaldson spent fifteen years, beginning at age nineteen, traveling the world conducting studies of various cultures' arts and crafts. Seeking a nicer place to raise children, the family left California and settled first in Wilmington and, in 2001, in Asheville. Donaldson produces between sixty and eighty pieces a month. Many are shipped to galleries for sale. He does about twelve craft shows a year. One of the most popular pieces he sells is titled THE BRIDGE.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p188-190, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8252
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Storyteller Connie Regan-Blake of Asheville maintains a busy schedule, performing nationally and internationally and conducting workshops to teach others the art of telling stories. A visit to her cousin, who was working in a library, started Regan-Blake on her storytelling career. In 1975, the two women decided to tell stories full-time, and for the next three years they performed around the country. They eventually settled in Asheville where Regan-Blake met her future husband. In July, the National Storytelling Network presented her with the 2006 Oracle Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of her “sustained and exemplary contribution to storytelling in North America.”
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p97-98, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8262
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The Southern Appalachian Radio Museum is one of the state's smaller museums. It occupies a room in the Elm Building on the campus of the Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College. Volunteers discuss with visitors the assortment of transmitters, receivers, converters, code keys, ham radios, and other vintage items from the history of radio.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p146-148, 150, 152, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8467
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Kevin Beck of Blowing Rock is a realist painter who concentrates on landscapes. He is also a plein air painter, which is a fancy way of saying he paints on location. Beck has painted in a variety of locations in this country, Mexico, New Zealand, and Panama. Mountains have always been one of his favorite subjects. In 2006, he painted over one hundred new works. Beck and his wife, Judi, own the Upstairs Gallery in Blowing Rock which features his original works and the works of eight other fulltime artists.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p168-170, 172, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8494
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Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a necessity in slowing global warming. Methane is one of the strongest greenhouse gases. In Burnsville, Energy Xchange is making creative use of the methane gas that is produced by trash. This innovate project sits atop a capped six-acre landfill and uses the methane gas from it as a fuel source for greenhouses and artists' kilns. Hardee discusses the two programs that the gas fuels. One is three-year residency program for potters and glass blowers. Space is available for four clay artists and two glass artists. The greenhouse component, which is heated by boiler water moving through radiant flooring, is called Project Branch Out and concentrates on growing native plants and seeds.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p78-80, 82, 84, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8498
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Milling discusses the creations and technique of Waynesville quilt artist Wendy Bowen. Bowen transforms scraps of fabrics into beautiful quilts with earthy colors and patterns.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 9, Feb 2007, p154-156, 158, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8687
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In 1936, Addie Clawson of Watauga County was hired to carry the mail, typically a man's job. There were complaints from both men and women. The men complained because they didn't get the job, and the women complained because she was wearing pants and doing a man's job. This did not deter Clawson. She didn't own a car; she didn't even know how to drive. In the three days before she was to report to work, she and her husband bought a car, and she learned to drive it. The car would take her only so far on the rough roads. Her husband would meet her halfway on her route with a horse, and she would ride on. They would switch in the evening on her way back to the post office. During her thirty-year career, Clawson carried the mail on rough roads and through blizzards and floods. She retired in 1966.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p100-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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