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19 results for La Vere, David
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Record #:
4967
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La Vere describes a tour of Revolutionary War sites, with stops at Tryon Palace in New Bern, Moore Creek National Battlefield, the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, and Kings Mountain.
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Record #:
5920
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Born a free man in Northampton County in 1858, Dr. Manassa Thomas Pope grew up to be a prominent African American physician in Raleigh, a businessman, soldier, and politician. His Raleigh home, built in 1901, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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6523
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Waynesborough, founded in 1787 as the seat of Wayne County, was burned by General Sherman's soldiers in 1865. In the 1980s, the Old Waynesborough Commission decided to recreate the town. Original 18th- and 19th-century buildings were collected around Wayne County and relocated to the old town site. Today more than 15 buildings, including a general store, working blacksmith shop, and one-room school, comprise Waynesborough Historical Village.
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Record #:
6758
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After selling their cucumbers to the big produce markets, farmers in Wayne and Duplin Counties were always left with a number of small, crooked ones that wouldn't sell. In the early 1920s, Lebanese immigrant Shickrey Baddour hit upon the idea to soak them in brine and make pickles. By 1925, his company was packing 6,000 cases of pickles a year. That was the start of the Mt. Olive Pickle Company, which today is the largest independent pickle company in the country. Mt. Olive pickles are number one in the Southeast and the second best-selling pickle in the United States.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p110-112, 114, 116-117, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6989
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Located in Beaufort County, Bath, incorporated in 1705, is North Carolina's oldest town. In 1704, John Lawson laid out the town, which soon attracted farmers and ranchers to settle there. The surrounding area was a source of tar, turpentine, and other naval stores. La Vere discusses the town's history and the plans for the year-long tricentennial celebration, with opening ceremonies beginning on March 8, 2005.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 8, Jan 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7014
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Today North Carolinians have modern appliances like gas-packs to heat their homes, electric stoves to cook their food, and refrigerators to cool and preserve food and provide ice. La Vere discusses the times before these conveniences when North Carolinians used coal for heating and cooking and imported ice from New England for cooling. Use of coal started after the Civil War and continued till around 1950. The first ice shipment from the north reached Wilmington in 1817, and shipments continued until 1902. Artificially made ice made importing it impractical.
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Record #:
7189
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The Frisco Native American Museum, located on Hatteras Island at Frisco, is a labor of love for Carl and Joyce Bornfriend. When he was nine years old, Carl began collecting Native American artifacts in his native Pennsylvania. When he moved to the Outer Banks to teach in the early 1980s, he brought with him his collection of 100,000-plus items from many tribes. He has continued collecting, and now displays the artifacts in a small, very cramped museum. His efforts to preserve Native American relics have earned him high praise from Native Americans, and the Lenni Lenape Indians of Pennsylvania adopted him into their tribe.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p86-88, 90, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7332
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Bob Jenkins, a native of Sneads Ferry, spent much of his early life in Wilmington, before going off to study interior design. When he returned to Wilmington in the late 1960s, he found the downtown area had become seedy and catered to a coarse trade. Families had moved out, and many of the old historic homes were decaying or being torn down. Jenkins became a pioneer when he opened a design shop near the riverfront and purchased one of the historic homes nearby. Fortunately, he found other like-minded individuals who cared about revitalizing downtown and preserving historic buildings. Today more than three hundred blocks of downtown Wilmington are on the National Register of Historic Places, and the town is mentioned in the same breath as Savannah and Charleston. Jenkins retired in 1989, and is the owner and sole employee of Wilmington's Adventure and Walking Tours.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p134-138, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7369
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Under the soil of North Carolina lies a treasure trove of amazing and ancient fossils. The state's oldest fossil, the pteridinium, dates from 550 million years ago and was found in Stanly County. Fossils are found in the state from the Appalachian Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean shoreline. Marine fossils are found east of I-95, with the town of Aurora being a treasure trove for shark teeth and other marine life. Dinosaurs are found only in two areas in the southeastern part of the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p94-96, 98-99, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7476
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Ivey Hayes, age fifty-seven, was born on a farm in Rocky Point in Pender County. By age seven he displayed artistic talent, and by high school he was earning $20 for portraits of neighbors. After college he was drafted into the army in 1971, but later received a medical discharge because of arthritis that would plague him the rest of his life. La Vere discusses how Hayes has dealt with rheumatoid arthritis, how he earned a living before returning to painting, the various phases of his painting, and how he discovered the signature style by which he is known. Hayes has exhibited his work at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., galleries in New York and other major cities, and across North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p222-224, 227, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7790
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North Carolina's coast remained sparsely populated until the mid-20th-century. The attraction with the coast began with the influx of people during World War II. After hostilities ceased, a building boom began with high-rise hotels, condominium towers, strip malls, and beach houses crowding into environmentally delicate areas. The North Carolina Coastal Federation, organized in 1982, is a nonprofit organization that has a simple mission--protect the coast. La Vere discusses the NCCF's three-pronged strategy for coastal protection and the work of the state's three coastkeepers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p110-112, 114, 116, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8256
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For over twenty years, Joan Leotta, of Calabash, was a well-known storyteller in the Mid-Atlantic and New England states and was a featured storyteller at the White House, the Kennedy Center, and the Smithsonian Institution. She not only tells stories but performs them as well, becoming individual characters in her award-winning one-woman show, Time Traveler.
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Record #:
8470
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North Carolina has a good road system, but one 100 years ago, traveling in the state was quite different. Then each county, instead of the state, was in charge of its roads. Most roads were unpaved. Few roads connected people to other counties, and even fewer connected to roads outside the state. To go long distances, either in North Carolina or outside of it, people took the train. La Vere recounts the history of road development in the state during the 20th-century and what changes may occur over the next 50 years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p60-62, 64, 66, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8469
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Whiteville, the county seat of Columbus County, first appeared in written records in a 1733 land grant. The town was heavily involved in agriculture throughout its history, producing tobacco, timber, naval stores, and pecans. La Vere discusses the town's history and some of its interesting personalities. Attractions for visitors include the Pecan Festival, Guiton's Drug Store, the Vineland Depot, and the North Carolina Museum of Forestry.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8788
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The North Carolina Museum of Forestry, located in Whiteville, is a satellite museum of Raleigh's North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The museum's mission is to showcase the vast forest diversity of the state. Established in 2000, the museum includes samples of native tree species, petrified wood, and remnants of the state's turpentine industry. Currently housed in the old Pioneer Savings and Loan building in Whiteville, work is proceeding in the development of a multi-million dollar, 40,000-square-foot, two-story facility complete with a living forest both indoors and outdoors.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p152-154, 156, 158, 160, il Periodical Website
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