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12 results for Bath--Description and travel
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Record #:
1791
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town of Bath was Britain's first seat of power in colonial North Carolina. The Palmer-Marsh House, the political and economic heart of colonial Bath, was recently restored after suffering fire damage in 1989.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 3, Aug 1994, p10-12, il
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Record #:
4084
Abstract:
Founded in 1705, Bath, the oldest incorporated town in the state, was prominent in politics and trade until after the Revolution. Today, with its population swelled from twelve to 250 over almost three centuries, it is a small, quaint, historic town, attractive to visitors.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 10, Mar 1999, p55-58,60, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6989
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Beaufort County, Bath, incorporated in 1705, is North Carolina's oldest town. In 1704, John Lawson laid out the town, which soon attracted farmers and ranchers to settle there. The surrounding area was a source of tar, turpentine, and other naval stores. La Vere discusses the town's history and the plans for the year-long tricentennial celebration, with opening ceremonies beginning on March 8, 2005.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 8, Jan 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7356
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bath, founded in 1705, is North Carolina's oldest town. The population has hardly increased since its founding, with the 2000 census reporting 286 residents. The town consists of a handful of shops; quiet, tree-shaded streets lined with old homes and historic structures; and a marina on Bay Creek. Green takes the reader on a walking tour of the town.
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Record #:
9294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Incorporated in 1705, Bath is the oldest village in North Carolina. Because the town is much as it was in the 19th-century, the State Historic Bath Commission and the State Department of Archives and History have worked to make Bath an historic showplace. Many old buildings have been restored and a visitors center has been erected. \r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 9, Feb 1980, p10-11, il
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Record #:
10888
Abstract:
Silcox-Jarrett describes things to see and do, where to stay and where to eat during a weekend visit to Bath and Belhaven.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 10, Mar 2009, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11981
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kapp discusses what can be seen during a visit to Bath, the state's oldest town. Each year the town's history, charm, and a relaxing slow pace attract over 30,000 visitors.
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Record #:
24630
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bath, the oldest town in North Carolina, is seeking funds to restore the historic town by purchasing restoring old homes and limiting modern construction within the town limits.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 9, October 1958, p10-11, il
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Record #:
7921
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's early immigrants were a mixed group that included well-to-do planters, laborers, artisans, apprentices, indentured servants, and convicts. In 1701, John Lawson first sighted the land where Bath would be built. Word of this desirable area quickly spread, attracting new immigrants from other colonies to move to North Carolina. In 1704, Lawson drew plans for the town, and in 1705, Bath incorporated. The surrounding area was a source of tar, turpentine, and other naval stores. Latham discusses the town's history.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p3-5, il, map
Record #:
28652
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Rest Haven church near Bath, NC and its unique setting and congregation are detailed. The outdoor church is on the banks of the Pamlico River and was founded in 1950. The congregation takes turns giving sermons and leading the service. Stories and memories are shared of the church and its place in the lives of the local residents.
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Record #:
30509
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once a colonial capital of North Carolina and hideaway for pirate Blackbeard, Bath is celebrating its 250th anniversary. The four day event held in October, included pageants, colonial costume, and church singing groups.
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Record #:
35510
Abstract:
How historic Bath earned its title as a national historic district: by being the colonial capital and the first incorporated town in the state. This small town, made up of 231 denizens, earned its popularity through shops such as The Tu Da Shoppe and Pirate’s Treasure. Playing a greater role, though, was many and varied displays of southern hospitality.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p19-21