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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Retirement communities
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Record #:
1712
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is one of the leading retirement destinations in the country. Trends in retirement are changing, and retirement facilities in the state, such as Carol Woods in Chapel Hill, are remodeling and redesigning to suit the needs of retirees.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 7, July 1994, p13-20, il
Record #:
7235
Author(s):
Abstract:
A favorable climate and the availability of retirement havens that stretch from the mountains to the coast attract many retirees to North Carolina. Because retirees are more mobile than those of yesteryear, many of these retirement areas offer golf, luxurious homes, fishing, tennis, spas, and other aspects of the good life.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p12, 14, 17-18, 20, 22, il
Record #:
29422
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the fast growth of retirees in North Carolina comes the rapid growth of development of retirement housing and continuing care communities. Developments across the state have made North Carolina the fourth-largest state in terms of such communities.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Jan 1992, p21-22, 24-26, por
Record #:
32558
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s population of people over the age of sixty-five is increasing and searching for alternative accommodations. Dr. W. W. Dickson, a veterinarian in Gastonia, founded Covenant Village, Inc., a combination retirement home and nursing center. The center aims to provide comfortable living with access to recreation and health services.
Source:
Record #:
34772
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sea Level, North Carolina, is home to the oldest retirement home in the United States, Sailor’s Snug Harbor. Created in 1801, the home was founded to care for aging and worn out sailors. In 1833, the facility was officially opened in Long Island, New York to care for retired merchant seamen. While the original property retained its historic value, residents required updated medical facilities which led to the search for a new facility. Sea Level was chosen, and in 1976, the home reopened in North Carolina. The facility’s maritime history remains part of the community; today, maritime art and nautical artifacts adorn the institution which is home to retired mariners and non-mariners alike.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p15-17, il
Record #:
36265
Author(s):
Abstract:
With an increase in elderly populations, facilities such as CCRCs, home health agencies, assisted living centers, and nursing homes are all the more a must. Illustrating the need and benefits of these services are statistics related to elderly populations, changes in socio-cultural values related to the heightened need, and profiles for facilities such as River Landing in Wallace.
Record #:
36272
Author(s):
Abstract:
With an increasing number of Americans living the golden years, facilities such as Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) are experiencing a financial and occupational boom. Asserting the ever growing need for facilities such as the profiled Belle Meade and Plantation Estates were statistics for this elderly population and health conditions such as Alzheimer’s.
Record #:
38177
Author(s):
Abstract:
The golden years, traditionally a time to engage in activities like traveling, is increasingly being defined by today’s elderly by volunteering in nonprofit agencies like ourBRIDGE. Through this volunteer opportunity, a bridge has been built between two gaps. One is elderly needing to make the most of their golden years and children of immigrants and refugees needing afterschool and summer programs. The second is the senior citizen population at Aldersgate, a retirement community in east Charlotte and the nearby immigrant population.