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15 results for Bath--History
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Record #:
4960
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Turnage gives a brief look at what was happening in New Bern, Beaufort, and Bath on the eve of the American Revolution.
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Record #:
6989
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Located in Beaufort County, Bath, incorporated in 1705, is North Carolina's oldest town. In 1704, John Lawson laid out the town, which soon attracted farmers and ranchers to settle there. The surrounding area was a source of tar, turpentine, and other naval stores. La Vere discusses the town's history and the plans for the year-long tricentennial celebration, with opening ceremonies beginning on March 8, 2005.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 8, Jan 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
13091
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To mark the 250th anniversary of the oldest town in North Carolina, a pageant was written and performed by Governor Hodges, among others. Local churches held special homecomings, and numerous visitors from throughout the state gathered at historical meetings, high teas, and street dances.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 9, Sept 1955, p12-13, 29, f
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Record #:
16726
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Bath is North Carolina's oldest incorporated town and its first port, chartered by an act of the Colonial General Assembly in 1705 in the picturesque country between the eastern Piedmont and the barrier islands of the Outer Banks.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 2005, p21-25, 27-28, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
24630
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Bath, the oldest town in North Carolina, is seeking funds to restore the historic town by purchasing restoring old homes and limiting modern construction within the town limits.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 9, October 1958, p10-11, il
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Record #:
21969
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This article discusses the significant homes and people of Bath. Included in the article are the old Marsh home, the first library in the state, and the old Fort, as well as residents such as Christopher Gayle, Mary Evans, and Tobias Knight.
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Record #:
16078
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Towns appeared only after established proprietary rule and the state's first incorporated town was Bath. A charter was granted in 1705 complete with town boundaries and a group of commissioners charged with town layout, selling lots, and building essential infrastructure like a courthouse, church and market.
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Record #:
26916
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In May 2016, Bath celebrated 300 years of seaport history. In 1716, England’s Lords Proprietors designated Bath as an official seaport, paving the way for hundreds of years of history. Although the town is no longer a busy port, it still celebrated its history with reenactments and costumed interpreters.
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Record #:
7921
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North Carolina's early immigrants were a mixed group that included well-to-do planters, laborers, artisans, apprentices, indentured servants, and convicts. In 1701, John Lawson first sighted the land where Bath would be built. Word of this desirable area quickly spread, attracting new immigrants from other colonies to move to North Carolina. In 1704, Lawson drew plans for the town, and in 1705, Bath incorporated. The surrounding area was a source of tar, turpentine, and other naval stores. Latham discusses the town's history.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Spring 2006, p3-5, il, map
Record #:
28662
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The famous Anglican minister George Whitefield’s visits to North Carolina and the town of Bath are described. Whitefield was famous for his passionate sermons and drew large crowds when he preached, but this did not happen in North Carolina. Whitefield visited Bath and the state several times and did not like what he experienced initially. Whitefield’s opinions of NC as a place with a “loose” lifestyle of dancing and entertainment and indifference toward religion is documented.
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Record #:
35504
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NC's celebration of the US’ birthday wasn’t confined on ship. It also involved cruising by places on land that showcased NC’s contribution to America’s history. There were towns such as Edenton, Bath, and New Bern. It included dwellings like Orton Plantation, the Benjamin Wright House, and Tryon Palace. Also were landmarks such as the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Wright Brothers Memorial, and Blockade Runner Museum.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p8-10, 12-14
Record #:
35510
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How historic Bath earned its title as a national historic district: by being the colonial capital and the first incorporated town in the state. This small town, made up of 231 denizens, earned its popularity through shops such as The Tu Da Shoppe and Pirate’s Treasure. Playing a greater role, though, was many and varied displays of southern hospitality.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p19-21
Record #:
36154
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A life ended at thirty-six exuded influence spanning two centuries: a city park, street, creek, and bridge named for him. Evidence perhaps obscure, though, was produced during his lifetime: John Lawson’s History of North Carolina (1705).
Record #:
36219
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Edward Teach’s story is reflected in his dwellings and dealings in towns such as Beaufort and Bath. Blackbeard’s legend can be explained in exploits before and after his capture in 1718.
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Greenville Times (NoCar Oversize F264 G72 G77), Vol. Issue , April/May 2015, p29