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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Ministers
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Record #:
19342
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hall was born in Pennsylvania in 1744 and came with his parents to North Carolina in 1751. He decided on a ministerial career and studied at Princeton. He was preaching in Rowan County when he entered the Revolutionary War, serving as a valiant soldier. He was a fine preacher, a good schoolteacher, and a great leader of men.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 38, Feb 1944, p6, 22
Full Text:
Record #:
24525
Abstract:
The second British Minister to the United States, Robert Liston, visited North Carolina with his wife in 1979 after the Revolutionary War. This article presents their experiences and opinion of North Carolina during their visit.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 4, September 1977, p10-12, il
Full Text:
Record #:
22563
Abstract:
During the reign of King William the Third, expenses incurred in the passage to America could be partially paid for every Church of England missionary or school-master who would undertake the journey. One such missionary was Reverend Thomas Burges, who made his way, via Virginia, to North Carolina in 1760. Burges settled in the Edgecomb Parish, Halifax County, North Carolina, where he taught school as well as worked in the ministry until his death in 1779. His eldest son from his first marriage, Henry John Burges, born in 1744, followed his father's example and became ordained in England in 1768. Leaving North Carolina for Virginia in 1770, Burges became a well-known supporter of the American Revolution while continuing to preach.
Record #:
28662
Author(s):
Abstract:
The famous Anglican minister George Whitefield’s visits to North Carolina and the town of Bath are described. Whitefield was famous for his passionate sermons and drew large crowds when he preached, but this did not happen in North Carolina. Whitefield visited Bath and the state several times and did not like what he experienced initially. Whitefield’s opinions of NC as a place with a “loose” lifestyle of dancing and entertainment and indifference toward religion is documented.
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Record #:
35688
Author(s):
Abstract:
The golden weed was tobacco, part of a scam that went down in history. It was memorable partly because of the unexpected co-conspirators for the shady sale of the tainted tobacco: two men passing themselves off as reverends.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p38-43
Subject(s):
Record #:
36177
Author(s):
Abstract:
Contemplated was the physical resurrection of Jesus Christ and spiritual resurrection of those who believe in His resurrection. Providing proof that the resurrection of flesh and spirit matters equally was an application of Paul’s letters to the Corinthians, Colossians, and Philippians.
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Record #:
36314
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through Reverend Lisa Saunders’ work, lately being reflected in a memoir, she has learned a valuable lesson about life. It's one that applies just as aptly to the beginning or end of life. The immaterial reward of a life well lived—a good legacy left behind—is more important than material rewards.
Record #:
38250
Author(s):
Abstract:
Warsaw Presbyterian Church, a town fixture since the late nineteenth century, still creates a sense of community, one extending beyond the sanctuary and the popular Christmas Eve service. The congregation of 120 and self-defined community pastor share a sense of community through activities such as co-running a food pantry and providing plates of food for town newcomers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 7, Dec 2011, p160-162, 164, 166, 168 Periodical Website