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27 results for Religion
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Record #:
21510
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Sometime before 1824, the slave celebration of Jonkonnu spread to North Carolina from the Caribbean Islands. Jonkonnu is a unique Christmas celebration in which elaborate costumes are worn and distinctive dances are danced to celebrate the holiday. The tradition was transplanted to America with Caribbean slaves and became a custom in black communities until about 1900 when it was abandoned by African-Americans.
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Record #:
25207
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There has long been a debate about dominion versus stewardship when it comes to man’s creation. Some churches are now using that debate to talk about man’s responsibility to the environment.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Fall 1993, p5, il
Record #:
25558
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Brett Whalen, a UNC assistant professor of history, researches medieval theology and the apocalypse. In his book, Dominion of God, Whalen traces the cycle of apocalyptic thinking throughout the Middle Ages and its influence on the papacy.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 27 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p36-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25680
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According to UNC sociologist Charles Kurzman, the kind of radicalization that leads to violence is much less common in the United States than in Western Europe. Reasons for this could be demographics, law enforcement, communication, and political activism. Omid Safi, a religious studies professor, says that Muslim Americans should become more involved in public discourse to help curtail radicalization and terrorism.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 3, Spring 2010, p30-33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26125
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Christian Smith, assistant professor of sociology, completed a study on evangelicalism and learned that it is one of the strongest religious movements around. Evangelicals’ strength comes from their ability to retain members, their educational mobility, and the large role that religion plays in members’ lives.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Fall 1998, p22-24, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26166
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Warren Nord, lecturer in philosophy, contends that public schools and universities today come close to indoctrinating students against religion by almost completely ignoring it. He argues that neutrality doesn’t just mean that it’s okay to teach students about religion, but that you’re required to teach them about it if you teach them things that are hostile to religion.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, September 1996, p7-8, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26168
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Carl Ernst, Chair of religious studies, went to Iran for a conference on Persian culture. While there is conflict in Iran, Ernst says the culture is misunderstood. He is trying to develop a program in Persian studies to enhance the curriculum in religion and foreign policy.
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Record #:
28324
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Next week, the Wake County School Board will decide whether to cleanse the personnel record of former Enloe High School teacher Robert Escamilla. Escamilla was suspended, reprimanded and reassigned to another school after inviting Kamil Solomon to speak to students about his government persecution in Egypt. Instead, Solomon talked about the evil of Islam. Escamilla believes students need exposure to different views to receive an education, but hate speech and the persecution of religious groups has no place in the public school system.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 42, October 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
34870
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Fayetteville filmmaker Jeremiah McLamb draws on his church, the Northwood Temple, for inspiration in his works. McLamb began writing short scripts during his childhood. This blossomed into a passion when he began filming stage productions in high school. After graduating, he started a company to produce commercial films and has since made two full length movies that tell stories of redemption and spirituality. Inspired by the mainstream acceptance of faith-based films, McLamb is confident there is a market for faith-filled cinema.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , July/August 2016, p36-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34874
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This article discusses religious art which can be found in sacred spaces around Fayetteville, North Carolina. The author visited various holy spaces and documented some of the art which remains pertinent to those in the congregation.
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Record #:
34907
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Farr Fitness in Fayetteville, North Carolina, operates out of the home of Brian and Morgan Farr. In 2015, the Farr family began inviting friends to train with them. As they formed a small community, they decided to run Farr Fitness as a free gym and Christian ministry. Over the past two years, more than 350 people have trained with the Farr’s.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , January/February 2017, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34915
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A model that started in Michigan, Friendship House is a sustainable living practice that pairs young adults with disabilities and seminary students together in affordable, secure housing. Dr. Scott Cameron, a neonatologist turned pastor, lived in a Friendship House during his studies at Duke University and was greatly moved by his experiences. Dr. Cameron now aims to create a Friendship House in Fayetteville which would pair medical residency students with community members to foster independent living skills, community, and friendship.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , April 2017, p28-31, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
35066
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The story of how a carpenter managed to rebuild a friendship and cure a handicapped child (with cover art).
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Record #:
35364
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Told from the viewpoint of a young boy, the church-goers of a town usually go and pray at the bedside of a dying person until they pass. In this particular case, however, the man who lay in the sickbed was not prayed over because people thought of him as a bad man for drinking and not attending church.