NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


26 results for Education--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
10796
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Griffith, a clergyman and the first teacher in North Carolina, opened a school in Pasquotank County in 1705. His success with the town people was noted in a letter from missionary William Gordon to British officials in 1708. Griffith left the school in 1709 and later taught Indians along the Nottoway River in Virginia.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 24, May 1967, p10
Full Text:
Record #:
13764
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before Calvin H. Wiley issued his North Carolina Reader 1851, the school children of North Carolina received their only information concerning their native state from geographies written by Northern authors, who had very little first-hand information.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 43, Mar 1952, p13, 15
Full Text:
Record #:
16833
Author(s):
Abstract:
Republican nominee John Tedesco will face fellow nominee Richard Alexander in November elections. The winner will run against incumbent Democrat June Atkinson for the position of state superintendent of public instruction. John Tedesco is a Wake County school board member and his opponent a special educator from Lancaster, S.C.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 26, June 2012, p5, 11 Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
17441
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has made tremendous economic progress; however, the full capacity for education of North Carolina's peoples have yet to be achieved. The State Education Commission has proceeded with a study covering various areas of improvement from inequality and instruction, to staff and finance.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 14 Issue 11, Nov 1948, p1-12, f
Record #:
18208
Author(s):
Abstract:
PPB refers to the Program, Planning, and Budgeting program for the state's educational system. The program was applied for the first time to education in 1969 and was intended to prevent long-term problems in education. Six areas of education were targeted by the program; developing basic skills, improving vocational and occupational output, advanced professional talents, overall improvement of citizen and community, research, and support of education.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 7, Apr 1969, p5-9
Record #:
20357
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Aycock, 50th Governor of North Carolina, was a staunch advocate for public education improvement within the state. Among his promotions was universal education, which would offer education to everyone, despite race or economic status.
Full Text:
Record #:
22773
Author(s):
Abstract:
For admission purposes, most higher education institutions require students to take standardized tests. Rural North Carolina students often do not have ready access to test preparation as urban students do. Since 2012, a program called ASPIRE--ACT Supplemental Preparation in Rural Education--has successfully prepared students for standardized testing at a fraction of the price.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 47 Issue 5, May 2015, p28-29, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
23065
Author(s):
Abstract:
To increase enrollment, William Peace University and Belmont Abbey College cut their tuition prices in 2012 and 2013, respectively. This article discusses the means by which these institutions reduced tuition costs and the problems other North Carolina private colleges face with sharp enrollment declines and financial issues.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
24470
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Stanley County academy, called Yadkin Mineral Springs Academy, was led by Edgar Freeman Eddins and known for its high standards and the fact that most of its graduates went to college and achieved positions of prominence in North Carolina and elsewhere.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 5, October 1991, p13-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24753
Abstract:
In the early twentieth century, life in North Carolina revolved around agriculture. Schools provided extracurricular activities for students who would spend their lives farming the land by creating corn clubs, tomato clubs, Future Farmers of America, and 4-H.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 1, Fall 2015, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
24932
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1953, the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association has brought students from across North Carolina together to learn more about North Carolina history in their area. More than 5,000 students participate in the program across 53 counties, making the North Carolina program the largest in the nation. Students learn about their community’s place in history, conduct research, and present what they discovered.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p30, 32-33, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25515
Author(s):
Abstract:
As North Carolina State Parks turns 100, tourism has grown from 4.2 million visitors in 1972 to 15 million visitors in 2015. The state parks system includes 41 parks and covers 225,537 acres.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
25524
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a two-year study along North Carolina’s coast, the effects of sea-level rise and saltwater exposure on freshwater amphibians were investigated. Research findings show that the green tree frog has shown the ability to thrive in habitats of higher salinity than other frog species. These results are derived from the discovery of green tree frogs living and thriving in saltwater marshes of relatively high salinity.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2016, p20-25, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
25745
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s political leaders and the N.C. Constitution say all children have a chance for equal education, no matter where they live. The legislature has adopted a plan to spend $735 million to upgrade North Carolina’s public schools. But a profile of Chapel Hill Senior High and Bertie High explains why the new Basic Education Plan won’t close the gap between rich schools and poor ones.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 6, March 26-April 8 1987, p1, 11-15, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Melinda Ruley, writer for the Independent, wanted to see how writing is being taught in the 1980s. She visited elementary and middle schools in Raleigh, and English courses at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After two weeks of observation, Melinda found that school children used their imaginations to form impressions and describe their world, whereas older adults used experience in writing.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Feb 23-Mar 8 1989, p19-24, il, por Periodical Website