NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


77 results for Poetry
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 6
Next
Record #:
3897
Author(s):
Abstract:
African-American poetry and poets are alive and well in the Triangle area. Somewhere on any given night, poets are reading and sharing their creations. One of the most popular places to hear poetry is Durham's Poetic Soul Lounge.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 41, Oct 1998, p33, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7183
Abstract:
In 1965, the East Carolina University Poetry Forum started. The forum's mission was to bring creative writing to campus, and for the past forty years, poets of all persuasions have attended the twice monthly meetings to freely discuss their creations. Hundreds of students and others have come through the years. Peter Makuck, a distinguished writer, ECU English professor and adviser, has been the forum's director since 1977.
Record #:
7245
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smith discusses the work of poet Michael McFee, an associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. McFee has won awards for teaching excellence and for artistic and scholarly achievement. He is the recipient of a writing fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts. He has written five books of poetry and had edited a book of poems by contemporary North Carolina writers.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7248
Author(s):
Abstract:
Poet Michael Chitwood, visiting professor in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, discusses his early interest in writing and his poetry, including The Weave Room. The book of poems is about the people who worked in the textile mill in his hometown of Rocky Mount, Virginia, and their struggle with unionization.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
10218
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Henry Boner was born in Salem, North Carolina, in 1845. Rogers recounts incidents in the life of this little-known North Carolina poet.
Source:
Record #:
23313
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Applewhite discusses the lives and writings of two poets, Randall Jarrell (1914-1965) and William Wordsworth (1770-1850).
Source:
Record #:
22133
Abstract:
An original poem about North Carolina written by Pattie Williams Gee.
Full Text:
Record #:
27372
Author(s):
Abstract:
The co-editor of The Southern Review, Dave Smith, discusses the state of Southern Poetry. Southern poets are quite often excluded from mainstream publications and the public view based on their subjects. Smith acknowledges the need for diverse voices in publishing including more women and black authors. He concludes Southern poetry still does exist and there are accomplished poets despite the bias.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 5, Jan. 30- Feb. 5 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
27373
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill poet Paul Jones attempts to explain why poets write poetry and why they meet to share their writing. Jones tells a humorous story of a poetry reading at Cat’s Cradle with an ex-convict with a gun. Jones says episodes like this make him question why he organizes poetry workshops. He decides poets are motivated because of their desire to share, to learn, to be taken serious, to be published, and to be challenged.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 5, Jan. 30- Feb. 5 1991, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27678
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Need is a religion professor at Duke who recently published a translation of Rainer Maria Rilke’s (1875-1926) poetry. The publication was a collaboration between Need, Durham’s Horse & Buggy Press, and artist Clare Johnson. The 500 copy letter-pressed edition focuses on Rilke’s rose poems about beauty love. Need, his printer, and Johnson attempted to reflect that by making a beautiful book that included the French originals with translations and original drawings.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 41, October 2014, p22-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
27700
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ross White is a nationally recognized poet, editor of Bull City Press, and a teacher at the North Carolina School of Science & Mathematics. White describes himself as a cheerleader for other poets and his press publishes chapbooks and the magazine Inch. White is also the founder of two national poetry projects, The Grind and the Frost Place Chapbook Competition. White’s first book of poetry was recently published called How We Came Upon the Colony.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 42, October 2014, p20-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27701
Author(s):
Abstract:
Celisa Steele is looking to raise the community profile and diversify the lineup for the 9th annual West End Poetry Festival. Steele is Carrboro’s poet laureate and is looking for new programming and opportunities to get the local public involved in the festival. The festival focuses on poets with North Carolina roots, writing traditional poetry.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 42, October 2014, p20-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27737
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nathaniel Mackey is a poet, novelist, critic, and Durham resident. Mackey has been widely successful and is influential as a black experimental writer whose poetry has a musical, jazz-like quality. The author discusses the influence that Durham’s poetic community has had on him and how he approaches writing poetry.
Source:
Record #:
27792
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Indie Poetry Contest has named its winners for 2011. Ricky Garini placed first; Matthew Valades, second; Alisha Gard, third; and P.J. Gallo received an honorable mention. Repetition and the number three tied all four poets work together as the theme for this year. Each poet’s winning poem is printed with a short biography of the poet and an explanation of the poem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 8, February 2011, p16-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27867
Author(s):
Abstract:
The winners of the annual IndyWeek poetry contest are announced. The topic that unites this year’s winners is nostalgia and regret. Winners include: first place, Robin Kirk’s “Carolina Parrot; second place, Julia Greenberg’s “Cross-section of a Hayfield;” third place, David D. Marshall’s “The Lost Colony of Roanoke Island;” and honorable mention, James A. Hawley’s “Lump.” The winner’s poems, their meanings explained by the poet, and a short biography of each poet is included.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 8, February 2010, p16-21 Periodical Website