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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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Record #:
5803
Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society instituted a new award in 2001, the Thomas McGowan Award, given to a society member for outstanding service to the Society. Appropriately, the first recipient was Tom McGowan. Among his many contributions to the society are editing the North Carolina Folklore Journal for twenty-two years, founding and editing for twenty-two years the society's newsletter, and along with Karen Baldwin, instituting the Community Traditions Award.
Record #:
7371
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1987, the Museum of World Cultures at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington created the North Carolina Living Treasure award. The award is modeled after a similar program in Japan which holds up for national recognition the creative work of an individual. The award is one of the highest honors given in North Carolina to honor creative excellence. Since 1987, eleven North Carolinians have been honored with the award. Recipients include potters, a boat builder, glass and wood artists, musical instrument makers, and a gunsmith.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p118-120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7822
Author(s):
Abstract:
James McAllister and Williamson Fuller were both born in Fayetteville in the mid-19th-century. McAllister's wife was a slave owned by a distinguished Cumberland County family which included his friend Fuller. McAllister was so grateful for their friendship that he willed his property to Fuller. Fuller combined the five thousand dollars he received for selling the property and his own five thousand dollars worth of Bethlehem Steel Co. stock to create the “James McAllister Fund.” It is not a charity; monies are distributed annually as Christmas gifts to “recognize colored people who live in close community and harmony with both races.”
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 54 Issue 7, Dec 1986, p7,29, il
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Record #:
12850
Abstract:
The Preserve America Community Program \"is a federal effort to encourage and support preservation and enjoyment of America's cultural and natural heritage.\" Twenty-nine communities across the nation received the award this year. Five of them were from North Carolina: Asheboro, Hendersonville, Hillsborough, Waxhaw, and Transylvania County.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 60 Issue 8, Aug 2010, p7, il
Record #:
26676
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Abstract:
The Duke Power Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was selected to receive a 1984 National Conservation Award by the National Wildlife Federation. Duke Power participates with the state wildlife agencies in bass population studies, performs water quality monitoring on all of its lakes, and incorporates watershed protection in land-use planning.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1985, p15
Record #:
26794
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Abstract:
Dr. Fred S. Barkalow, Jr., received a distinguished service award at the 38th annual meeting of the North Carolina Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts. This award recognizes one person who has contributed most to soil and water conservation efforts, statewide.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p5, por
Record #:
27792
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Indie Poetry Contest has named its winners for 2011. Ricky Garini placed first; Matthew Valades, second; Alisha Gard, third; and P.J. Gallo received an honorable mention. Repetition and the number three tied all four poets work together as the theme for this year. Each poet’s winning poem is printed with a short biography of the poet and an explanation of the poem.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 8, February 2011, p16-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27867
Author(s):
Abstract:
The winners of the annual IndyWeek poetry contest are announced. The topic that unites this year’s winners is nostalgia and regret. Winners include: first place, Robin Kirk’s “Carolina Parrot; second place, Julia Greenberg’s “Cross-section of a Hayfield;” third place, David D. Marshall’s “The Lost Colony of Roanoke Island;” and honorable mention, James A. Hawley’s “Lump.” The winner’s poems, their meanings explained by the poet, and a short biography of each poet is included.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 8, February 2010, p16-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28840
Author(s):
Abstract:
The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Triangle Chapter’s Design Awards recognizes the local architecture profession’s most talented designers. The 2009 awards acknowledged varied institutional and residential projects, including an addition to a historic church, a restaurant and a new installation in the North Carolina Museum of Art’s Art Park.
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Record #:
31613
Author(s):
Abstract:
W.C. Carlton of Morehead City retired in 1973 after serving for twenty-three years as manager of Carteret-Craven Electric Membership Corporation. The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association awarded Carlton with the Clyde T. Ellis Award for his outstanding leadership in state and national rural electric programs. This article provides background on Carlton and highlights his contributions to the rural electric program.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Mar 1976, p10-11, por Periodical Website