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16 results for Poets, North Carolina
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Record #:
10400
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In 1966, Vida Munden Nixon lived outside Bailey, N.C., on a small farm and wrote poems. Hundreds of Mrs. Nixon's poems have been set to music and used in national contests during her later years. Her success in these contests helped her gain a job on the editorial staff of The Gospel Song Publishing Association of America, Inc. where she continues to write poems.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 14, Dec 1966, p9, 31, por
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Record #:
10763
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Dr. Richard Walser has completed a new biography on George Moses Horton who was known as the slave poet when he lived in Chapel Hill during the 1820s. Horton published three books of poems, POETICAL WORKS, THE HOPE OF LIBERTY, and NAKED GENIUS.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 20, Mar 1967, p15, 18
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Record #:
12588
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October 17, 1962 marks the 55th anniversary of the death of North Carolina's poet and, \"sweetest singer\", John Charles McNeill. McNeill produced the majority of his work between 1902 and 1904, and was awarded the Patterson Cup in 1905, for the best literary production of the year.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 9, Sept 1962, p13, por
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Record #:
14455
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There haven't been an outstandingly large number of poets in North Carolina, but there are some who have left an indelible mark upon the literature of the nation as a whole. John Charles McNeill immortalized the Lumber River and the blooming dogwood, while Henry Stockard wrote of the inflamed Southern manhood, and John Henry Boner published works on the whispering pines.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 34, Jan 1948, p11, 20
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Record #:
14498
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Henry Jerome Stockard was a man who lived a beautiful life. Although his writings were not many, they are regarded as being the most beautiful poetry ever composed in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 4, June 1945, p9, 16-17
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Record #:
14523
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Remembered as the \"poet of cottonland\", John Charles McNeil recaptured, with the magic of his pen, the simple charm and lasing beauty of country life.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 13, Aug 1945, p6-7, il
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Record #:
14922
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Donald Parson was a well-known poet who was born and educated in the North but resided in Pinehurst. He helped found the Academy of American Poets and was an active member of his community in Pinehurst. Parson published two volumes of poetry, the first titled \"Glass Flowers,\" and a volume about John Keats, a favorite poet of Parson and the man he was often compared.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 32, Jan 1944, p5, 25-26, il
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Record #:
17144
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Lawrence, a close friend of John Charles McNeill, recalls the poet's characteristic traits as well as his likes and dislikes. McNeill was from Riverton in Scotland County.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 29, Dec 1938, p5, 18
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Record #:
27373
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Chapel Hill poet Paul Jones attempts to explain why poets write poetry and why they meet to share their writing. Jones tells a humorous story of a poetry reading at Cat’s Cradle with an ex-convict with a gun. Jones says episodes like this make him question why he organizes poetry workshops. He decides poets are motivated because of their desire to share, to learn, to be taken serious, to be published, and to be challenged.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 5, Jan. 30- Feb. 5 1991, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27605
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Every two years, the governor selects a poet to become the next NC Poet Laureate whose job is to teach, judge, counsel, and cheerlead, using poetry to connect people. Governor McCrory recently appointed an unqualified individual to the position causing a backlash from the literary community. Following the uproar, Valerie Macon resigned after only one week on the job. The past four Poet Laureates discuss the importance of the position and have offered to help McCrory select the next Poet Laureate.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 32, August 2014, p16-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
27678
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David Need is a religion professor at Duke who recently published a translation of Rainer Maria Rilke’s (1875-1926) poetry. The publication was a collaboration between Need, Durham’s Horse & Buggy Press, and artist Clare Johnson. The 500 copy letter-pressed edition focuses on Rilke’s rose poems about beauty love. Need, his printer, and Johnson attempted to reflect that by making a beautiful book that included the French originals with translations and original drawings.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 41, October 2014, p22-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
27700
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Ross White is a nationally recognized poet, editor of Bull City Press, and a teacher at the North Carolina School of Science & Mathematics. White describes himself as a cheerleader for other poets and his press publishes chapbooks and the magazine Inch. White is also the founder of two national poetry projects, The Grind and the Frost Place Chapbook Competition. White’s first book of poetry was recently published called How We Came Upon the Colony.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 42, October 2014, p20-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27701
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Celisa Steele is looking to raise the community profile and diversify the lineup for the 9th annual West End Poetry Festival. Steele is Carrboro’s poet laureate and is looking for new programming and opportunities to get the local public involved in the festival. The festival focuses on poets with North Carolina roots, writing traditional poetry.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 42, October 2014, p20-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
27737
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Nathaniel Mackey is a poet, novelist, critic, and Durham resident. Mackey has been widely successful and is influential as a black experimental writer whose poetry has a musical, jazz-like quality. The author discusses the influence that Durham’s poetic community has had on him and how he approaches writing poetry.
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Record #:
36552
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Carl Sandburg is perhaps widely known in the United States as a poet and lesser known as a writer of children’s stories. Perhaps better known by North Carolinians about Sandburg is Connamara, Greek Revival summer house in Flat Rock where he lived with his wife, who was just as well known in the community for her raising goats. This dwelling, built in 1839, is a National Historic site.