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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for Poets
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Record #:
2129
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Alex Albright, a professor in the East Carolina University Department of English, has edited a collection of A.R. Ammons's poems, THE NORTH CAROLINA POEMS, that captures the longing a person feels for his home state when he is far away.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 4, Jan 1995, p16, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7183
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In 1965, the East Carolina University Poetry Forum started. The forum's mission was to bring creative writing to campus, and for the past forty years, poets of all persuasions have attended the twice monthly meetings to freely discuss their creations. Hundreds of students and others have come through the years. Peter Makuck, a distinguished writer, ECU English professor and adviser, has been the forum's director since 1977.
Record #:
7245
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Smith discusses the work of poet Michael McFee, an associate professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. McFee has won awards for teaching excellence and for artistic and scholarly achievement. He is the recipient of a writing fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts. He has written five books of poetry and had edited a book of poems by contemporary North Carolina writers.
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Record #:
7248
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Poet Michael Chitwood, visiting professor in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, discusses his early interest in writing and his poetry, including The Weave Room. The book of poems is about the people who worked in the textile mill in his hometown of Rocky Mount, Virginia, and their struggle with unionization.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p20-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8037
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In this INDEPENDENT interview, poet Michael Chitwood discusses reading, his writing, and the publication of his latest book, GOSPEL ROAD GOING.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 30, July 2006, p30-31, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9306
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Arthur Devernon Hugur was one of 19th-century North Carolina's best botanists and published volumes of poetry under the name Chucky Joe. Living in Hendersonville, he wrote often of Herbert's Spring and other places as he traveled through the mountains.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 10, Mar 1980, p16-18, il
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Record #:
9480
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In 1949, before he became a world-famous poet, A. R. Ammons held his first teaching job at Hatteras Elementary School in Hatteras Village on the Outer Banks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p204-206, 208, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10218
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John Henry Boner was born in Salem, North Carolina, in 1845. Rogers recounts incidents in the life of this little-known North Carolina poet.
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Record #:
10653
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North Carolina's Poet Laureate, James Larkin Pearson, at age 91, has released his latest collection of poetry, MY FINGERS AND MY TOES, which will be presented in a Publication Day Ceremony at Wilkes community College on April 25, 1971. Because of his outstanding achievements in the field of literature, Pearson received the Distinguished Citizen's Award on April 5th, and Governor Scott also proclaimed April as James Larkin Pearson Month.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 22, Apr 1971, p15, por
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Record #:
12253
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Robert Frost's last ambitious poem \"Kitty Hawk\" alludes to his first visit to North Carolina. Having recently been rejected by Elinor White, 18 year old Frost walked from Norfolk to Dismal Swamp where he intended to commit suicide. For over sixty years, the famed poet guarded the truth about his painful confrontation about death.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 10, Mar 1975, p14-15, il
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Record #:
16426
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There are many folk motifs in the poetry of Thomas Hardy. With his exposure to a culture steeped in folklore and the folk music of his fiddling father, Hardy created a poetry haunted by the sights and sounds of folklore.
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Record #:
18731
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Chitwood discusses the state of poetry in North Carolina and illustrates with excerpts from several poets.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 9, Feb 2013, p90-92, 94-96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21805
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The easy part is choosing a list of poems from the state's numerous poets, but bringing that list down to just ten that capture North Carolina is not. These ten come from \"exhaustive research, debate, and compromise.\" The list includes poetry by A.R. Ammons, George Moses Horton, and Ron Rash. The introduction to the collection is written by Billy Collins, a two-term Poet Laureate of the United States.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p66-72, 74, 76-77, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27372
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The co-editor of The Southern Review, Dave Smith, discusses the state of Southern Poetry. Southern poets are quite often excluded from mainstream publications and the public view based on their subjects. Smith acknowledges the need for diverse voices in publishing including more women and black authors. He concludes Southern poetry still does exist and there are accomplished poets despite the bias.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 5, Jan. 30- Feb. 5 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
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Record #:
27643
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Sacrificial Poets founder Kane Smego is looking for inspiration to continue his work. Smego is an educator, writer, and performer who has taught and performed slam poetry at the local and national level. He also was a poet-correspondent during the Arab spring spending two months in Egypt and Tunisia collecting oral histories and writing poems that were later used to produce a WUNC radio documentary. Smego is looking to take a break from teaching and running his nonprofit to write and gather inspiration from other sources.
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