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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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69 results for Roger, Lou
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Record #:
10014
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Sallie Southall Cotton married a Confederate Army officer after the Civil War and raised a family. Most women of that period settled in to do “womanly things” after their families had grown, but Mrs. Cotton embarked on a career of public service. She felt that working together women could achieve great things. In 1902, she was a force in founding the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, an organization that enabled women statewide to speak as a group for public school improvement, prison reform, and aid to the poor and elderly.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 5, Sept 1943, p12-13,, por, bibl
Record #:
10017
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In this continuing series of articles about women who have played dramatic and interesting roles in the history of North Carolina, Rogers discusses Cornelia Phillips Spencer. She was a skilled artist who drew sketches of Chapel Hill and wrote everything from poems to hymns and sketches of men, and women and events. She is known to North Carolinians for her efforts to close the University of North Carolina when it was being disgraced by the carpet-bag regime, and then working to get it reopened a few years later under a new regime.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 6, Oct 1943, p22-23, il, por, bibl
Record #:
10019
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Elizabeth Hutchinson was born in Ireland and came to America with her husband Andrew Jackson a decade before the Revolutionary War. They settled in North Carolina. She was widowed when her children were young and was largely responsible for the development of the character of her son Andrew, who would later become President of the United States. While caring for wounded American Revolutionary War soldiers in Charleston, South Carolina, she contracted a fever, died, and was buried in an unmarked grave.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 7, Nov 1943, p21, 31-32, bibl
Record #:
10034
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Rogers recounts the life Delia Dixon, who was born into the eminent family of Thomas Dixon, Sr. From early life she dreamed of being something unheard of in that time period--a woman doctor. Achieving her goal, she later married Norwood Carroll, a Raleigh dentist. She was the first woman doctor in the city of Raleigh and the first physician for Meredith College, a position she held for thirty-five years.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 8, Dec 1943, p12-13, 32, por
Record #:
10040
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Rogers recounts the life and literary accomplishments of Frances Fisher Tiernan, who, under the pen name “Christian Reid,” wrote almost fifty novels. The title of her most famous novel, THE LAND OF SKY, gave the phrase that has forever described the state's mountains.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 12, Apr 1944, p12-14, 30, il, por, bibl
Record #:
10042
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Rogers recounts the life and accomplishments of Fannie Heck, who was one of the most widely known religious leaders among Southern women.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 2 Issue 2, June 1944, p28-31, por, bibl
Record #:
10037
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Rogers recounts the life of Elizabeth Kelly, who is who is more widely known for her contributions to education than any other woman in North Carolina.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 10, Feb 1944, p22-23, il, por
Record #:
10036
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Rogers recounts the life of Mira Margaret Baird Vance, the mother of Zebulon Baird Vance, who was Colonel of the 26th Regiment and the wartime governor of North Carolina during the Civil War.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 9, Jan 1944, p24, 31-32, il, por, bibl
Record #:
10041
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Rogers recounts the life of Rebecca Boone, the wife of the famous frontiersman, Daniel Boone.
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Record #:
10045
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Penelope Barker had had an eventful life even before the famous Edenton Tea Party. She had three husbands and lost two to death; the third died in 1787. She bore six children, mothered three of her first husband's, and saw eight of her children die. The Edenton Tea party took place on October 25, 1774 and is the first recorded women's political rally in America. Barker organized fifty women to participate in order to send the English government a message of what women in North Carolina were prepared to do to resist repressive laws.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 2 Issue 7, Nov 1944, p15-17, il, por, bibl
Record #:
10044
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Born in Washington, North Carolina, Susan Dimock became the first woman member of the North Carolina Medical Society, although she never practiced medicine in the state. Refused admission to medical colleges in Boston, she applied to a Swiss university, was accepted, and graduated with a degree. She returned to Boston and became well established in her profession. On a voyage to Europe, she lost in a shipwreck off the coast of England.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 2 Issue 5, Sept 1944, p23-24, por, bibl
Record #:
10043
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Rogers recounts the life of Mrs. Hunter G. Smith (Josephine Churchill Graham), who recognized the needs of mothers, sisters, wives, and daughters of Confederate soldiers, many of whom were in destitute circumstances, and worked for the establishment of a home for them. Her goal was realized when the Confederate Women's Home opened in Fayetteville in 1915.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 2 Issue 3, July 1944, p26, 28-29, por, bibl
Record #:
10051
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Mary Lewis Wyche is considered by many the pioneer of organized nursing in the state. In 1902, she founded the North Carolina Nurses Association and was the driving force behind the passage of the first nursing act in the country which was passed in 1903.
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Record #:
10049
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Eleanor White Dare was the first English mother to bear a child in the New World, yet few facts about her remain to give a complete story. Rogers recounts what is known.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 2 Issue 8, Dec 1944, p22, 24-25, il, bibl
Record #:
10052
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rogers discusses the history of the organization and the work performed by North Carolina's home demonstration agents, from its inception in 1911 through to the end of World War II.
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