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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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14 results for Housing programs
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Record #:
15935
Abstract:
The current array of housing and social services has not effectively assisted poor families in attaining self-sufficiency. This article argues the goal of housing and social programs should be to help individuals and families achieve self-sufficiency, and outlines several programs and steps to this end.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Fall 1991, p46-50
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Record #:
24081
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Eblen Charities is a non-profit organization has followed its mission, 'help people stop hurting', for twenty-two years. Ove the years, Eblen has assisted tens of thousands of families through a number of programs and events, including dental programs, housing assistance, and health assistance.
Record #:
24074
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My Place is a non-profit organization located in Hendersonville that focuses on teenagers and young adults. It provides housing for youth coming from homelessness, educating them and providing job training along the way.
Record #:
24082
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eblen Charities is a non-profit organization has followed its mission, 'help people stop hurting', for twenty-two years. Ove the years, Eblen has assisted tens of thousands of families through a number of programs and events, including dental programs, housing assistance, and health assistance.
Record #:
27174
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Wake County commissioner Matt Calabria is working to raise awareness of a housing voucher program that places homeless and disabled vets into privately owned housing. Under the program, tenants pay up to thirty-percent of their incomes toward rent; the vouchers cover the rest.
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Record #:
28380
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The NC Community Land Trustees are winners of a 1992 Independent Citizen Award. The group has been promoting a new model of home ownership in Durham’s neglected West End neighborhood. The group buys run-down houses and rehabilitates them with volunteer labor and the prospective owners help. Then, using low-interest loans, the new residents buy their homes while the Land trust keeps the title to the land beneath them. When the residents move, they sell their house back to the organization, making home ownership affordable for low-income families.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 48, November 1992, p14 Periodical Website
Record #:
29095
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Durham County has one of the highest eviction rates in North Carolina. For those most vulnerable to rising rents and gentrification, eviction creates a cycle of debt, poor credit, and instability. A new program aims to provide those facing eviction with the resources they need to stay in their homes and keep an eviction judgment off their rental histories.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 26, July 2017, p12-13, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30384
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The North Carolina Foreclosure Prevention Fund is now helping unemployed homeowners to keep their homes, and may be able to help clients who are struggling to pay their mortgage. Created by the North Carolina Housing Finance Agency and funded by the United States Treasury, the effort pays the mortgage while individuals look for jobs or complete job trainings.
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Record #:
30413
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The Community Investment Corporation of the Carolinas (CICCAR) is a regional lending consortium offering permanent debt financing to support the development of affordable multifamily housing. This article provides information about the origins and operation of the program, its impact upon affordable housing, and potential changes in the program.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 92 Issue 3, Fall 2013, p30-31, por
Record #:
30454
Abstract:
Three hundred North Carolina lenders, including dozens of community banks, are key players in an effort that has helped unemployed North Carolina homeowners save their homes from foreclosure. The North Carolina Foreclosure Prevention Fund makes mortgage payments for qualified homeowners who have lost their jobs or experienced temporary hardships.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 2, Summer 2014, p35, por
Record #:
30871
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The Recovery and Reinvestment measure enacted by the federal government earlier this year expanded the Department of Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program to make more low-income people eligible for home improvement services. This article discusses how the program works, and provides a guide for low-income households in North Carolina that need help weathering houses.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 12, Dec 2009, p10-11, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
30999
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Advanced Energy, a Raleigh-based organization, is helping to rescue uninhabitable houses and turn them into new, energy-efficient residences. Their partnership with Builders of Hope is implementing the program in homes slated for demolition in Raleigh. The program is also works to ensure that the homes are financially affordable.
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Record #:
32175
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People in rural North Carolina are enjoying new homes as a result of the insured rural housing program of the Farmers Home Administration. The amount of the loan is based on the need of the family, the appraised property value, and the repayment ability of the family. These loans are made in rural towns of populations less than ten-thousand, such as Beaufort, Hyde and Washington Counties.
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Record #:
34915
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A model that started in Michigan, Friendship House is a sustainable living practice that pairs young adults with disabilities and seminary students together in affordable, secure housing. Dr. Scott Cameron, a neonatologist turned pastor, lived in a Friendship House during his studies at Duke University and was greatly moved by his experiences. Dr. Cameron now aims to create a Friendship House in Fayetteville which would pair medical residency students with community members to foster independent living skills, community, and friendship.
Source:
CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , April 2017, p28-31, il Periodical Website
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