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16 results for House construction
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Record #:
13085
Abstract:
Westmoreland examines a new trend in North Carolina home construction: downsizing. She interviewed home builders to learn what to expect from their newest projects and why.
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Record #:
15388
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Carrying houses to California was done during the gold rush period of 1849. The homes were of the knock-down type and were assembled at Beaufort from where they were shipping to the west coast.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 1, June 1936, p2
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Record #:
24697
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This article presents a new type of home for North Carolinians, a domed-like structure with a metal frame and spacious interior. The design started with a domed ski lodge and has taken off in other areas of the state.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 1, June 1952, p12-13, il
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Record #:
28007
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North Carolina has fallen behind on its commitment to make homes more energy efficient and better protected from weather. The state has decided to cut the number of houses they plan to weatherize in half and has only spent one quarter of its federal funding for the project. The state miscalculated how much work and money each home would cost to weatherize. The state will lose jobs and federal funding if it cannot accelerate the process.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 35, September 2010, pOnline Periodical Website
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Record #:
28520
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In Yadkin County, teacher and pastor Chris Hauser is working to fill both the spiritual and physical needs of those in his community. Hauser organized Impact Yadkin to help homeowners with construction repairs and to make their homes more accessible. At the same time, local youth volunteers learn hard work, compassion, service and a desire to better their community.
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Record #:
29094
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To mitigate the effects that large infill houses may have on adjacent homes, the city's unified development ordinance limits the height of new construction close to a home of more than twenty years’ existence. In a mid-century Raleigh neighborhood, developers are constructing houses that violate those limits.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 26, July 2017, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
29228
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Lloyd Remington, a chemistry professor at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and his wife Violet, have a home built underground. Hoping to use the consistency of underground temperatures to beat the high cost of energy, the natural insulation of the earth is paying off.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p30-31, por
Record #:
29627
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The recent trend of tiny house living has spread to Greenville, North Carolina. These tiny houses, which are as small as three-hundred square feet, promote a more affordable and simple lifestyle. Pitt County officials are now considering building and zoning requirements for tiny house development.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Fall 2017, p28-32, por
Record #:
29637
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Marcus Malek designed and built his house in Fort Bragg based on the concept of a “barndominium”. A barndominium is an idea to have a large garage and a small living space, all under the same roof. Malek describes the details involved in the architecture and construction process.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 2017, p30-38, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30191
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Older residents of North Carolina are embracing the tiny house movement. Many people have designed and built their tiny houses out of shipping containers. The low cost, portability, and small size make an ideal home for people who are retired, or wish to live close to or within a family member’s residence.
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Record #:
30732
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Since 2002, college teams have participated in the United States Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon to design and build a home that can produce as much energy as it consumes. Among the 2011 winners was Appalachian State University’s entry, The Solar Homestead. The house was inspired by the frugal self-reliant spirit of early Blue Ridge Mountains settlers, constructed from sustainable materials and designed to function on renewable energy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 12, Dec 2011, p13-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30824
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North Carolina’s State Energy Office, in partnership with three universities, offers a program to make factory-built manufactured housing more energy efficient and cost-effective long term. The Upgrade & Save program provides financial incentives to manufactured home retailers to sell ENERGY STAR-labeled homes, and encourages upgrading other manufactured homes to efficient heat pumps.
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Record #:
30871
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The Recovery and Reinvestment measure enacted by the federal government earlier this year expanded the Department of Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program to make more low-income people eligible for home improvement services. This article discusses how the program works, and provides a guide for low-income households in North Carolina that need help weathering houses.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 12, Dec 2009, p10-11, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
31567
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The American Wood Council has built a 1978 Idea House in Raleigh combining new uses of wood in construction with the dignity and charm of early American architecture. The house, which is open to the public, was designed to duplicate a colonial period home in Deerfield, Massachusetts, the Dwight-Bernard house. The house illustrates the durability and versatility of wood.
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Record #:
31712
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Joe and Andrea Sloop restored and remodeled a vacant tin-roofed white-frame house in Zionville, North Carolina. The house was originally built by a Watauga County Civil War veteran returning home from the war. Parts of the house are made of the now rare and expensive wormy chestnut wood.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 11, Nov 1973, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website