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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Sustainable architecture
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Record #:
7570
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The North Carolina Sustainable Design Competition, managed by North Carolina's Advanced Energy organization, gives students enrolled in the state's universities and community and technical colleges opportunities to learn and apply the principles of sustainable development in building design and construction. The competition, which began in 2000, gives prize money to winning designs. Since the competition began, several colleges, including East Carolina University, have incorporated these design principles into their curricula.
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Record #:
8853
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Abstract:
Canavan discusses a visionary project in Chapel Hill that promises to be North Carolina's greenest building. With the state's population projected to increase by 50 percent in the next decade, architects are asking the question, will people live in more of the same or will a new energy efficient, environmentally conscious architecture develop. Greenbridge, a $30 million pair of mixed-use towers planned for West Rosemary Street in Chapel Hill, exemplifies the new environmental trend and will set the standard in the state for sustainable architectural development.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 11, Mar 2007, p19-20 Periodical Website
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Record #:
23779
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Two plant experts who own Living Roofs Inc. share the benefits of rooftop gardens and greenery.
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Record #:
29685
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At Cherokee Investment Corp. in Raleigh, North Carolina, sustainable, green architecture is putting North Carolina on the map. The company's building is the first building in North Carolina to receive Platinum certification under the US Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design--LEED--rating system; one of only 61 in the world, and the first LEED-certified project in Raleigh. But with high performance and low cost, green and sustainable architecture is becoming accepted more and more in North Carolina.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p32-35, por
Record #:
30732
Abstract:
Since 2002, college teams have participated in the United States Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon to design and build a home that can produce as much energy as it consumes. Among the 2011 winners was Appalachian State University’s entry, The Solar Homestead. The house was inspired by the frugal self-reliant spirit of early Blue Ridge Mountains settlers, constructed from sustainable materials and designed to function on renewable energy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 12, Dec 2011, p13-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36558
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For homeowners, renters, and business owners wanting a healthier and eco-friendly interior environment, Green Gauge, created by the Western North Carolina Building Council, can fulfill both goals. Actions recommended: use energy and water usage wisely, improve indoor air quality, and use sustainable building and landscaping materials. Benefits include lower utility bills, a reduction of carbon footprint, and increased home value.