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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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27 results for Renewable energy
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10313
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Tazewell discusses alternative fuels available in North Carolina, such as biodiesel, ethanol, natural gas, propane, and electricity. Guidelines for deciding which to use are presented as well as ways to reduce emissions, conservation measures, and innovations being developed in North Carolina.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2008, p27-39, il, map, f
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Record #:
20899
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Over a decade ago, renewable energy projects were very sparse in the state. In 2003, NC Green Power was launched with the purpose of producing more green energy--energy produced from renewable energy sources like sun, wind, water, and organic matter. Shepherd reports on the growth of green energy over the last ten years.
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24794
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Journalist Edward Martin speculates about the future of North Carolina’s energy industry in the next decade. Based on current patterns, he predicts that natural gas may become a top energy source by 2026, that nuclear plants will grow, and that the role of renewable energy is still unknown.
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24826
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The Amazon Wind Farm US East in Northeastern North Carolina is the region’s largest economic-development project and is the first commercial-scale wind farm in the Southeast. This wind farm brings to light the debate over government’s role in promoting alternatives to natural energy resources like coal, gas, and nuclear power.
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28514
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Sandy Grove Middle School in Hoke County, North Carolina received a perfect score from Energy Star, which is a rare distinction. Served by Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation, Sandy Grove Middle School has a large photovoltaic solar array, geothermal heating and cooling systems, high efficiency lighting and additional spray foam insulation.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 2017, p6, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28573
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Controversy continues over wind power farms offshore North Carolina’s Outer Banks. While wind development would generate renewable energy, jobs and income, there are issues regarding politics, aesthetics, air navigation routes, and military training.
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28702
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North Carolina is a natural spot for converting poultry waste into power. A Farmville, NC area business called Carolina Poultry Power will convert 60,000 tons of turkey litter into steam energy to power turbines creating electricity. The details of the project and the politics which make it difficult are discussed.
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29031
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North Carolina’s House Bill 909 rolls back provisions requiring Duke Energy to purchase renewable energy projects, like solar, from independent producers at the avoided cost rate. Proponents say the bill will promote conservation by reducing the demand for fossil fuels, but critics argue that the legislation will actually limit the state’s solar infrastructure.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 17, May 2017, p12-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30186
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North Carolina has become an important player in renewable energy, with solar and wind farms and other projects attracting billions of dollars. The investment reflects state law requiring utilities to lessen their reliance on coal, natural gas and nuclear sources.
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Record #:
30662
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Electric cooperatives in North Carolina hope to see battery technology that allows storage systems for renewable energy and other uses, but it is still in the development stages. This article discusses the progression of the battery industry and current developments in battery storage systems.
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Record #:
30678
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North Carolina electric cooperatives are testing various ways to safely integrate new excess power into the grid, including battery storage and community solar systems. Community solar may open a new opportunity, offering backyard solar at a reasonable cost for consumers who may not have a site suited for solar.
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30696
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Solar energy is now helping power homes and businesses served by electric cooperative EnergyUnited, with a new photovoltaic solar farm in Taylorsville. The solar panels use a tracking system to follow the sun’s movement during the day, which increases sunlight capture and significantly reduces land use requirements. EnergyUnited is also investing in hydropower, wind power, and biomass projects.
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Record #:
30732
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Since 2002, college teams have participated in the United States Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon to design and build a home that can produce as much energy as it consumes. Among the 2011 winners was Appalachian State University’s entry, The Solar Homestead. The house was inspired by the frugal self-reliant spirit of early Blue Ridge Mountains settlers, constructed from sustainable materials and designed to function on renewable energy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 12, Dec 2011, p13-15, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30856
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The American Energy and Security Act establishes nationwide mandates on renewable energy and energy efficiency, requires reductions in greenhouse gases, and is the most costly federal energy bill in decades. North Carolina electric cooperatives met with Congress to discuss major energy and environmental legislation proposals. The implications for North Carolina consumers is discussed in this article.
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Record #:
30854
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North Carolina electric cooperatives are working with Congress to develop energy policies that balance reductions in greenhouse gas emissions while assuring reliable and affordable electric services. This article discusses the cap and trade system, and current efforts to develop renewable energy in the state.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 5, May 2009, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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