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8 results for Wind power--North Carolina
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Record #:
17018
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Abstract:
With the exceptional price increases and costs associated with conventional forms of energy, one must seriously consider the advantages of integrating alternative forms of energy with those already in existence. Energy may come from different sources and their predominance within geographic regions relies on a variety of physical factors and ancillary issues required to implement these practices. Wind has proven to be an inexpensive alternative energy source in the United States. This article uses Geographic Information Systems to study the feasibility of using wind as a viable energy source in North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 18 Issue , 2011, p35-44, map, bibl
Record #:
28573
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Controversy continues over wind power farms offshore North Carolina’s Outer Banks. While wind development would generate renewable energy, jobs and income, there are issues regarding politics, aesthetics, air navigation routes, and military training.
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Record #:
30870
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Duke Energy Corporation and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, hope to build three wind turbines set in twenty-foot-deep waters about seven to ten miles into Pamlico Sound west of the Outer Banks village of Avon. A study released in June reported that offshore wind development is capable of generating enough electricity to fulfill North Carolina’s total power needs.
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Record #:
31477
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In March 1981, Joe Stanley and his family acquired a windmill and became the first to use wind-generated electricity in the coastal Carteret County town of Emerald Isle. This article describes the history of windmills in North Carolina, and how Stanleys’ windmill generates power.
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Record #:
31527
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The windmill on Howard’s Knob at Boone has been the subject of extensive criticism due to various problems and complaints. According to John Sawhill, deputy secretary of the United States Department of Energy, the windmill was built as a research project to determine the feasibility of wind-generated electricity. Sawhill encourages people to report problems and concerns, so that wind turbines can be improved.
Record #:
31606
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Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation in Lenoir, North Carolina has been chosen by the United States Department of Energy to operate one of the world’s two largest wind-powered electric generators. A wind turbine generator, with the capacity to furnish electric power for about five-hundred homes, will be built on Howard’s Knob in Watauga County. Research will investigate how the wind generator will affect the environment and surrounding community.
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Record #:
34902
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In 2008, the Outer Banks Brewing Station in Kill Devil Hills became the only restaurant and pub in the world to have a wind turbine on site. Because of the high power prices, the pub embraced the environmentally-friendly power source and hope to embrace solar energy as well.
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Record #:
36245
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Discussed was the increasing role that farmers have been playing in the development of renewable energy industries such as solar and wind. Examples profiled were a solar farm owned by Charlotte based Birdseye Renewable Energy LLC, located on a three hundred acre farm in Robeson County. Noted also was Duke’s Dogwood solar farm in Halifax County.