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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Electricity--Cost of
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Record #:
16170
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The cost of electricity is devastating Eastern North Carolina. North Carolina's bizarre municipal electricity system has devastated low-income people, tapped the savings of those on the margins, and strained an already frayed social safety net to the point of breaking.
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Record #:
30697
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North Carolina electric cooperatives are facing increasing pressures from new government regulations, rising fuel and materials costs, escalating demand for electricity, and required investments in both adding generation and upgrading existing power plants. This article discusses these different pressures and how they are impacting consumer electric bills.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 1, Jan 2011, p12-13, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30812
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North Carolina’s largest solar electric installation at a public school brings power to the grid and lessons to Cherokee County students. The rural school system is focusing on energy conservation and renewable energy production as ways to fill gaps in its education budget. Martins Creek School is the first school in the county to install solar power arrays, funded by Solar Energy Initiatives.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Sept 2010, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30854
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North Carolina electric cooperatives are working with Congress to develop energy policies that balance reductions in greenhouse gas emissions while assuring reliable and affordable electric services. This article discusses the cap and trade system, and current efforts to develop renewable energy in the state.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 5, May 2009, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30990
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Ground-source heat pumps, are environmentally-friendly, efficient systems which draw from the earth’s temperature underground to heat and cool interior spaces. Residents of Haywood County and Randolph County, North Carolina describe how the systems work, installation, and costs compared to conventional air-source electric heat pumps.
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Record #:
31398
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The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has decided that North Carolina rural electric cooperatives should help their power suppliers finance new power plants that are still under construction. The ruling, which would bring higher power bills for the consumer-members, allows an investor-owned utility to charge its wholesale customers up to half the cost of financing power plant construction work while the work is still being done.
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Record #:
31651
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Electric rates in North Carolina need to be completely revamped to incorporate a time-of-day pricing system similar to the system used for telephone rates, says State Senator McNeil Smith of Greensboro. This article discusses the peak load pricing system of electricity and North Carolina legislation.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 11, Nov 1975, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31672
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Rising costs and other aspects of inflation are eroding the financial resources of citizens of every level of income. This article assesses what is happening in rural North Carolina, how inflation is affecting farmers and its implications to rural electric consumers and cooperatives.
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Record #:
31676
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Robert N. Cleveland, executive vice president and general manager of North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, discusses the new fuel charge being applied to electric utilities bills. The fuel charge was implemented in response to the oil shortage and the increasing cost of operating mines under current environmental regulations.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 11, Nov 1974, p6-20, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31735
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Business has never been better for the utilities industry, yet things have become worse for the consumers who are confronting the power crisis and rising rates. Hugh Wells of the North Carolina Utilities Commission discusses public utilities in the state, and how consumers can help find solutions by participating in the regulatory process.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 8, Aug 1972, p6-7, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32212
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United States Representative Walter B. Jones advises rural citizens to speak up on behalf of a North Carolina electric membership corporation. In response to a letter criticizing low Rural Electrification Administration interest rates, Jones discusses the rural electrification program, the role of electric cooperatives, property taxes and loans.
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Record #:
32524
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The North Carolina Utilities Commission noted rising electricity costs due to inflation-influenced increases in the cost of financing and constructing new generating facilities to satisfy growing customer demand. Lester Teal, president of Control General Corporation of Raleigh, discusses the problem and how computer energy management systems can help to control the time and rate of electricity usage.
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