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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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40 results for Rural development
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Record #:
221
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Abstract:
With a fragile economy built on low-wage, low-skill jobs, rural North Carolina must remake its work force as its industries remake themselves.
Record #:
1020
Abstract:
Traditionally rural counties surrounding the state's metro regions are attracting businesses seeking cheaper land, a ready work force, and less local bureaucracy.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Apr 1993, p12-18, por
Record #:
1287
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Rural Initiative, an economic stimulus package intended to help rural communities in the state, was recently launched by state, federal, and private agencies.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 43 Issue 11, Nov 1993, p15, por
Record #:
1322
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North Carolina has created many initiatives to foster community development and small business enterprises, including the Capital Access Program and the new rural initiative, a $60 million public-private program.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 1, Jan 1994, p48-57, por
Record #:
1411
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Rural Initiative, led by the N.C. Rural Economic Development Center and modeled after a Michigan program, aims to channel $85 million of public and private funds to aid small businesses, local governments, and others in need.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 12, Dec 1993, p26-27, il
Record #:
1624
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economically strapped counties in North Carolina have been the major beneficiaries of efforts by the state's Industrial Recruitment Competitive Fund to bring industry, and thus jobs, to the state.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 6, June 1994, p47, por
Record #:
4535
Author(s):
Abstract:
Formulating ways to bridge the gap between thriving urban areas and low economic rural ones is the task of the North Carolina Rural Prosperity Task Force. Although the task force came up with seventy proposals, it narrowed the list down to six. These include providing investment capital for rural areas, increasing infrastructure, and developing new opportunities in agriculture.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 50 Issue 3, Mar 2000, p4, il
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Record #:
18223
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the early and mid-20th-century, population generally shifted to urban areas. However throughout the 1970s, the trend stalls and rural populations increased at the same rate as urban areas. Though considered a positive demographical change, growing populations in the state's countryside also caused land developers to reexamine land use, planning, and zoning of the rural landscape.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Summer 1980, p28-34
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Record #:
18648
Author(s):
Abstract:
Largely considered an agricultural state, census data from 1980 proved otherwise. Trends in rural land development pointed to the state becoming more urbanized and its rural areas less agriculturally focused. The article presents a series of tables to demonstrate changing demographics and land uses from the 1960s through the early 1980s.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Winter 1983, p52-57, il
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Record #:
22703
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Abstract:
Although largely forgotten in North Carolina history apart from a public park in his honor, Hugh MacRae (1865-1951) was an urban businessman who fostered economic opportunity and development, especially as related to southern farmers. After graduating from MIT, McRae returned to Wilmington in 1892 where he later consolidated gas, railway, light and power interests and promoted the development of several suburban communities. He later shifted his attention to the development of truck farms and model communities in southeastern North Carolina and the transformation of rural life through small-scale, intensive farming practices.
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Record #:
29435
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Abstract:
A third of North Carolina's counties are eligible for tax relief due to their rural status. The Jobs Tax Credit program and Industrial Building Renovation Fund are now aiming to attract business growth in rural areas by providing tax credits to companies and manufacturers for each new job, and renovating existing industrial buildings and infrastructure.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Feb 1992, p28
Record #:
30661
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loans and grants from the United States Department of Agriculture's Rural Development office can help low-income citizens buy or repair homes in rural North Carolina. This article provides information about various loans and grants offered in North Carolina, application instructions, and locations of Rural Development offices.
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Record #:
30664
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Rural electrification has been cited as one of the most significant turning points for modernizing North Carolina’s farms. This article explains the history of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension, and how it helped rural families learn about electricity and how to use it.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 6, June 2014, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30812
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s largest solar electric installation at a public school brings power to the grid and lessons to Cherokee County students. The rural school system is focusing on energy conservation and renewable energy production as ways to fill gaps in its education budget. Martins Creek School is the first school in the county to install solar power arrays, funded by Solar Energy Initiatives.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Sept 2010, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30855
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Abstract:
In many rural North Carolina counties, jobs have been lost due to the downsizing of traditional rural industries like textiles, apparel and furniture, as well as from restructuring in agriculture. Despite the challenges, rural counties have the advantages of open land, lower costs, and a growing market for local farm products. There are also various strategies to increase development and jobs in rural areas of North Carolina.
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