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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Electric Providers
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Record #:
22583
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over 8,000 representatives of the nation's electric cooperatives were present at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association's 73rd Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida in February 2015. North Carolina participants were in the spotlight on multiple occasions as board members, sponsored students, and prize winners.
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Record #:
28669
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than 100 electric power providers serve nearly 10 million people in North Carolina. These include consumer-owned electric cooperatives, investor-owned utilities, city governments, university-owned utility, or other utilities. The history, service areas, regulations of the electric power providers in the state are described and a map provides the service areas in the state.
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Record #:
30653
Author(s):
Abstract:
Buddy Creed was the system engineer for South River Electric Membership Corporation for forty-five years. In the last 15 years, Creed helped the cooperative to deploy technology to map its system to GPS coordinates, install engineering analysis programs, streamline inventory control, track projects in real-time, and improve services to rural communities in North Carolina.
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Record #:
30677
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Abstract:
North Carolina enacted the nation's first state law regulating disposal of coal ash. The General Assembly considered the legislation after a pipe ruptured in February at a coal ash basin near Duke Energy's generating plant in Rockingham County, resulting in coal ash spilling into the Dan River. Electric cooperatives have been engaged in this discussion because a portion of the electricity they supply comes from wholesale power agreements with Duke Energy and other providers.
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Record #:
31398
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Abstract:
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has decided that North Carolina rural electric cooperatives should help their power suppliers finance new power plants that are still under construction. The ruling, which would bring higher power bills for the consumer-members, allows an investor-owned utility to charge its wholesale customers up to half the cost of financing power plant construction work while the work is still being done.
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Record #:
31505
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Abstract:
A North Carolina rural electric cooperative is involved in a culture-to-culture program with Bolivia which has fostered the development of a “sister” cooperative in that country and, in the process, provided new perspectives on international relations. Board and staff members of the Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation in Lenoir have assisted the Bolivian cooperative in developing management tools, operating procedures, and technical support.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p28-29, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31649
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina tobacco farmers are finding themselves between a rock and a hard place as they face an unexpected cost problem in the operation of mechanized bulk curing barns. The farmers’ concern is shared by the state’s power suppliers because the problem relates to the electricity needed to operate the curers. North Carolina State University agricultural engineers plan to begin experimenting soon to find ways of making bulk barns more energy efficient.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 9, Sept 1975, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website