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10 results for Coal-fired power plants
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Record #:
5988
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Solid waste is a potential supplemental fuel for the state's coal-burning power plants. Axler discusses what would be involved in converting conventional power plants to ones that would burn waste. He also presents experiences other communities have had using this approach and identifies the power plants that are best suited to convert to this type of system.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Spring 1978, p46-53, il
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Record #:
11823
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Storm Technologies, Inc., headquartered in Albemarle, is a runner-up in the 2009 BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA Small Business of the Year competition. Founded in 1992, the company employs forty-two people and projects revenues in 2009 of $8 million. Storm Technologies specializes in consulting to the power industry and making boiler parts.
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Record #:
22637
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Anti-coal activist Emma Greenbaum has long lobbied Duke Energy to close its coal power plant in Asheville. Her efforts are part of a wider movement headed by the Sierra Club's nationwide Beyond Coal campaign.
Record #:
25298
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By 2017, all the coal-fired power plants in North Carolina must put new regulations into action which should lower the mercury outputs from these plants.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 26 Issue 1, Winter 2007, p8
Record #:
27255
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The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) had initially agreed that people living near coal ash pits should not drink their well water. From DENR’s perspective, the McCrory administration downplayed the risks before sending out do-not-drink notices. State epidemiologists argue that the public is confused and being misled.
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Record #:
27845
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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s cogeneration power plant and its use of coal is explored. The plant has won awards, but many are saying that it isn’t enough. The plant uses coal and will until 2050. Protesters are trying to pressure the university to reduce that goal by twenty years.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 6, February 2010, p5-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27850
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Claims from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that the majority of their coal comes from deep mines are explored. IndyWeek investigated these claims and found that a major supplier supplies coal from mountaintop removal mines. The other sources of UNC-CH’s coal supply are explored along with their environmental impact.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 7, February 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27925
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The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announced its plan to end coal use in its power plants in ten years. UNC is the first university to end its coal use since the Sierra Club targeted 60 universities who use coal last September. UNC was facing heavy pressure from students who claimed their efforts to be environmentally friendly were not going far enough. The university will switch to woody biomass and natural gas while exploring solar options.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 19, May 2010, p5 Periodical Website
Record #:
30652
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The United States Environmental Protection Agency is considering new environmental standards for coal power plants that would tighten regulations limiting power plant emissions. While North Carolina is less dependent on coal-fired generation than the rest of the nation, there will be impacts to existing power plants. This article discusses the history of North Carolina energy, and what cooperatives are doing to balance regulations and costs.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p12-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30677
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North Carolina enacted the nation's first state law regulating disposal of coal ash. The General Assembly considered the legislation after a pipe ruptured in February at a coal ash basin near Duke Energy's generating plant in Rockingham County, resulting in coal ash spilling into the Dan River. Electric cooperatives have been engaged in this discussion because a portion of the electricity they supply comes from wholesale power agreements with Duke Energy and other providers.
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