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32 results for Bishop, Owen
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Record #:
8614
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Artists are painting murals on the sides of buildings in a number of North Carolina towns. The murals are specific to the communities and the people who live there. In 1976-1977, Asheboro had a mural painted as part of its bicentennial celebration. The mural depicts a street scene from the turn of the century, complete with plank road and a bicycle-built-for-two. Cynvia Arthur, who was Randolph County's artist-in-residence, was the lead artist, assisted by artists Louise Culler and Audrey Beck. The mural took eighteen months from design to completion.
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Record #:
8611
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Standing atop Howard's Knob in Watauga County is the largest wind turbine generator in the world. The 325-ton windmill with 200-foot blades stands atop a ten-story tower. The windmill project involves two federal agencies, state and local governments, and private enterprise and is an effort to develop alternative energy sources to make the United States less dependent on foreign oil. The windmill is the fourth to be built in the country. Bishop describes what the windmill will do and the dedication ceremonies.
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Record #:
8609
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Now under construction along the Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville, the Folk Art Center will offer a unique blend of educational and entertainment activities while preserving the traditional folk arts of mountain culture. Crafts will be a major focus of the center. Other folk arts, like storytelling, folk music, and dancing, will also be represented. When completed in 1979, the $2 million center will house a gift shop, library, museum, information center, craft and exhibit work area, and a 300-seat auditorium.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 10, Oct 1977, p26-27, il Periodical Website
Record #:
8626
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Williams writes of the Southern experience in his works, developing themes that go beyond race and social class. His writing interest began at a young age in his hometown of Burgaw, and he channeled this interest into creative writing as a student at Morgan State College in Baltimore. After graduating, Williams moved to New York to pursue a career in the arts. For several years he wrote plays that were produced in obscure off-Broadway locations. In 1978, he finished his first successful play, HOME, but several years passed before it came to the attention of major producers, who took it to Broadway in 1980. Now that he has achieved success with this play, Williams is receiving new recognition for his other work.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p28-29, por Periodical Website
Record #:
8832
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The Elizabeth II, a 16th-century sailing ship, will be formally opened July 13, 1984, as part of the state's 400th Anniversary festivities. The ship will become North Carolina's only mobile historic site. Permanently based in Manteo, the Elizabeth II will on occasion visit other communities along the coast of North Carolina. The 50-ton vessel took 15 months to build.
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Record #:
9056
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Johnston County native, Pamela Barefoot, recently published a book entitled “Mules and Memories, a Photo Documentary of the Tobacco Farmer.” Upon quitting her counseling job in Richmond, Virginia, Barefoot, who came from a family of tobacco farmers, spent the next eighteen months compiling photos for the book. In 1972, she graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University, but photography was merely as a hobby at that time.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 11, Apr 1979, p15-17, il, por
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Record #:
10958
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North Carolina author Hinton Rowan Helper's one best-seller, THE IMPENDING CRISIS: HOW TO MEET IT, brought him acclaim in the North and disdain in the South. His book dealt with the effect of slavery upon the three-fourths of the Southern whites who owned no slaves, and, therefore, could not benefit from the system of slavery. By 1860, over 142,000 copies were in print, and it was second in popularity only to UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 23, May 1968, p11-12, por
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Record #:
31309
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Unit One of the Catawba Nuclear Plant has produced its first electricity as part of preliminary testing of the facility, which is partially owned by North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations. The plant, which is located in York County, South Carolina, nineteen miles southwest of Charlotte, is a joint venture involving electric co-ops, municipalities and Duke Power Company.
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Record #:
31314
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North Carolina’s congressional delegation, along with members from other tobacco producing states, will be trying to cash in some green stamps this year as they try to save the federal tobacco program. Federal support of the tobacco industry is being criticized for the negative effects of tobacco on health, and faces competition with foreign markets and imported tobacco leaves.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Mar 1985, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
31359
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An amendment has been proposed to establish the North Carolina Agricultural Financing Agency, which would issue revenue bonds to finance capital growth in agriculture. The measure would give farmers a tax-exempt financing source for improvements in production, processing, marketing and distribution of any farm products. More efficient and productive farms would ultimately translate into more economical food prices for the consumer.
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Record #:
31418
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North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations have launched a new statewide effort to help state and local officials entice new industries into building plants within co-op service areas. This article explores how a major industry, dubbed the “Snowbird” plant, chose its site in Wake Forest and impacted the Wake County community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Sept 1983, p10-12, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31424
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North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are profiling prime industrial sites as part of a new determination to become a visible force in the competitive bidding for major industrial plants. They are doing this economic development “homework” so they can speak fluently with industry representatives about how much their territories have to offer. New industrial operations would improve the economy of the state’s rural areas.
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Record #:
31512
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“The Woodwright’s Shop,” the made-in-North Carolina television series about 19th Century woodcraft techniques, is going national this fall. Roy Underhill’s television series will be aired nationally by Public Broadcasting Service, and his new book based on the television series is currently being published. This article discusses Underhill’s background, and use of alternative technology and humor to entertain the woodworking layman.
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Record #:
31510
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When the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was threatened by storms and beach erosion last winter, a 150-foot strip of sandbags and rubble was installed near the base of the historic landmark. Efforts are now being organized to provide permanent protection for the lighthouse. Proposals include building a circular revetment around the lighthouse’s base, moving the lighthouse, or extending the present groins and pumping new sand onto the beach.
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Record #:
31547
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North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations are seeking funding sources for construction of a peat-fired generating plant near Creswell in Washington County. The plans include a preliminary feasibility study of the proposed plant, which would be the first of its kind in the country. With North Carolina’s extensive peat reserves, the proposed plant could supply all of the state’s energy needs for at least twenty-three years.
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