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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for Chaney, Jim
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Record #:
8428
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The governor of North Carolina, largely because of various organizations, businesses, and lobbying groups, spends a great deal of time proclaiming special observances, days, weeks, and months. So numerous have these proclamations become that the governor has to hold two proclamation days a month to take care of the signings and attendant ceremonies. In 1969, Gov. Robert Scott signed 143 proclamations. Carolina Country visited the governor and describes what a proclamation day is like.
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Record #:
8438
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Catfish farming is booming in the lower Mississippi River Valley, but how successful would it be in North Carolina? While people in the deep South consider catfish a delicacy, many North Carolinians consider the catfish a trash fish. The primary obstacles to catfish farming in the state are the unavailability of processing facilities and the lack of a steady market.
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Record #:
12156
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The interstate highway system is a projected 41,000 mile network of through highways laid out to connect military bases, sea ports, principal cities, and industrial areas. The Federal Government wants the roads built to serve both heavy interstate commercial traffic and military traffic in times of emergency. North Carolina benefits by receiving 717 miles of interstate that will be paid for by the government.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 16, Dec 1956, p29-30, 39, il, map
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Record #:
31672
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Rising costs and other aspects of inflation are eroding the financial resources of citizens of every level of income. This article assesses what is happening in rural North Carolina, how inflation is affecting farmers and its implications to rural electric consumers and cooperatives.
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Record #:
31691
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This article describes historical Fourth of July celebrations in Raleigh, which consisted of cannon salutes and toasts. In July of 1800, the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Weekly Advertiser reprinted the Declaration of Independence and published sixteen salutes that were given by cannoneers at the Raleigh independence festival.
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Record #:
31716
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As the city of Raleigh continues to grow, it also changes and many of the old buildings are torn down. In this nostalgic article, Jim Chaney recalls landmark buildings, such as the Wake County Courthouse, the old Wachovia Bank Building, and the original headquarters for The News and Observer. He also discusses new developments in Raleigh.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan 1972, p17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31734
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The rural free delivery (RFD) has been serving farmers since 1896. In the early days, RFD patrons individualized their mailboxes to help rural carriers recognize where to stop. The one-horse plow, old iron pump, and other relics are still seen across rural North Carolina today supporting mailboxes.
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Record #:
31984
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The late Dr. Henry Jordan, Cedar Falls dentist turned industrial who served as Governor Kerr Scott’s State Highway chairman, predicted that interstate highways would lead to the end of the automobile age. As the costs of owning and operating an automobile increase, and traffic and parking problems persist in Raleigh, Jordan’s prediction seems to be coming true. This article discusses transportation planning in North Carolina.
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Record #:
31988
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North Carolina has over one-million people who lack the minimum income to meet their family needs. A study conducted by the North Carolina Fund showed that contrary to the widespread belief, the average poor person works forty hours a week or more, would like more job training and wants their children to get a good education. This article discusses the study’s results and implications in North Carolina.
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Record #:
32011
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Medical professionals tend to seek jobs in city hospitals, but they are also needed in rural areas and small towns. Several anonymous general practitioners comment on their problems and their satisfactions of the medical profession in rural North Carolina.
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Record #:
32012
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At the 29th annual meeting of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, rural electric leaders, including representatives of North Carolina’s electric membership, considered the dimensions of the energy crisis. This article discusses how North Carolina plans to find solutions in obtaining an adequate supply of dependable, economical electric power.
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Record #:
32171
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The North Carolina Division of Commerce and Industry has an effective program, but greater participation is needed from communities, counties and local organizations. Herman Anderson, president of the North Carolina Industrial Developers Association, discusses setting up industrial development programs in rural communities and offers examples of successes in Lenoir County.
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Record #:
32201
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In the early 1800s, the Supreme Court was held in such low esteem in some parts of the country that the legendary Chief Justice John Marshall was declined tailor service in Raleigh. One of Marshall’s letters written from Raleigh on January 2, 1803, offers an insight into the great man’s ways. Marshall also gives his perspective on several North Carolina Federalists and Supreme Court judges.
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Record #:
32209
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Joe Garrett, North Carolina’s Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, operates the State Highway Patrol and administers the state laws governing motorists and motor vehicles. In this article, Garrett discusses thirteen causes of motor vehicle accidents and fatalities. Some of the efforts to prevent highway fatalities include education campaigns, driver safety programs, and enhanced enforcement of drunk driving and speeding.
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Record #:
32220
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Many North Carolina firms are producing pre-built housing, which represent the latest development in low-cost modern housing. The change they are bringing in the industry has caused the North Carolina Mobile Housing Institute to change its name to the North Carolina Manufactured Housing Institute. Becky L. Griffin, the Institute’s executive director, discusses how the new unit could be an answer to North Carolina’s housing shortage.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 2 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p6-7, il, por Periodical Website