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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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30 results for Historic buildings
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Record #:
1768
Abstract:
North Carolina's recent entries in the National Register of Historic Places bring the state's total to 1,858. Southern surveys the recent additions and offers capsule histories of each.
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Record #:
1972
Author(s):
Abstract:
A process that has been used by foresters and the timber industry is now a valuable tool in assisting historians in precisely dating old houses and maritime artifacts.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p26-29, il, f
Record #:
2300
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dendrochronology, a way to date trees, has been refined by Dr. Herman J. Heikkenen and is now a valuable research tool for state historians in accurately dating historic buildings, like Edenton's Cupola House.
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Record #:
2760
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Abstract:
Visiting the state's historic attractions at Christmas time provides an opportunity to see places like Tryon Palace, Biltmore House, and Chinqua-Penn Plantation House dressed up for the holidays.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 7, Dec 1987, p24-29, il
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Record #:
2799
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Abstract:
As of June 30, 1995, the state owned eighty-one properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A listing of properties and their location in thirty counties is included.
Record #:
3644
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Abstract:
In December, 1969, the state submitted its first property nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. On July 4, 1997, the Church of the Immaculate Conception and the Michael Ferrall Family Cemetery in Halifax became the 2,000th nomination.
Record #:
8359
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tomlin takes the reader on a photographic tour of some of North Carolina's historic churches, ranging from a grandiose cathedral to a humble meetinghouse. A brief sketch of each church's history accompanies each photograph. Churches include St. Philips Anglican Church (Brunswick); Machpelah Presbyterian Church (Lincoln County); and West Grove Friends Meeting House (Alamance County).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 7, Dec 2006, p92-98, 100, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13193
Abstract:
This article contains a listing by county of some of the historic homes and buildings in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 23, Apr 1956, p16-17, f
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Record #:
13218
Abstract:
A continuation from a previous article in The State (April 7, 1956, Vol. 23, No. 23, pp. 16-17), this list details more of the historic buildings, by city, in North Carolina
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 25, May 1956, p13, f
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Record #:
14153
Abstract:
Buffalo Presbyterian Church was started in 1756 and is one of the most historic churches in North Carolina. Throughout the years it has had a most interesting existence.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 26, Nov 1949, p6
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Record #:
14261
Abstract:
A Tar Heel describes his visit to the famous English palace of Hampton Court, where Sir Walter Raleigh plead with Queen Elizabeth I and where Manteo and Wanchese visited.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 4, June 1947, p6-7, f
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Record #:
14272
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Family seat of one of the oldest families in the Piedmont section of North Carolina, the Old Spurgeon Home is a ten room mansion still in a fine state of preservation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 6, July 1947, p8, 19, f
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Record #:
15822
Abstract:
January 24, 2008 at 3:45 a.m., authorities were alerted to a fire which started at the childhood home of Governor Charles B. Aycock. Damage from the fire affected several rooms, the worst damage in the parlor, and destroyed several artifacts. Other damaged artifacts and a portion of the structure will have to be cleaned and restored.
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Record #:
20411
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Abstract:
Lawrence states that he \"is of the opinion that ten structures in the state are of interest to North Carolinians.\" These include the Biltmore House, State Capitol, Hayes Mansion House at Edenton, Old East Building at UNC, and Governor Tryon's Palace at New Bern.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 7, Jul 1945, p1-2, 18, il
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