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21 results for Religion--Practice of
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Record #:
20156
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This bulletin discusses the law applicable to conflicts that pit an individual's desire to exercise his or her personal religious beliefs against the state's need to establish governmental rules and norms that have the effect of prohibiting such practices and forcing the individual to choose between obtaining a governmental benefit or exercising one's religious beliefs. The bulletin begins with a brief review of the legal principles governing these issues and concludes with an analytical framework for use in confronting these issues.
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Record #:
27433
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Mason details growing up in a conservative Baptist home and the effect the church had on his family and daily life. Growing up in Westminster, NC, he details his religious education and how his views on religion changed as he became a teenager and was “saved.” He details moving from blind faith to skepticism and doubt as he observed the religious individuals in his life and his experiences.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan. 4-10 1990, p11-12 Periodical Website
Record #:
27872
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Carrboro resident Bruce Thomas is known as the soul of Weaver Street. Thomas is known for exploring spirituality though movement and meditation and he does this on the street. The former inmates life was changed by mediation and his journey to spirituality is documented. Friends and locals talk about the impact he has on the community and hi place in it.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 9, March 2010, p16-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28082
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Chapel Hill resident Sadie Rapp decided to “go green” for her recent bat mitzvah. Making decorations, Rapp and her family repurposed garbage and recycled materials and encouraged guests to walk or carpool to the event. Rapp also decided to donate a portion of her gifts to charity and her blog on the experience has gained national attention from rabbis. Rapp said it is up to those who have completed their bat mitzvah to be responsible and take care of the world.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 52, December 2009, p4 Periodical Website
Record #:
28456
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The 1994 Muslim Youth of North America East Zone Conference was recently held in Durham. 550 Islamic teenagers gathered to listen to mentors remind them what it means to be Muslim and its impact on their lives. The issues that affect all teenagers, but especially Muslim ones are detailed and described by presenters and participants.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 49, December 1994, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28382
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The number of Muslims in the Triangle-area is growing and four area Muslims provide a glimpse into their faith lives and the religion itself. They discuss the ideas that many have about their worship practices, family life, sexual roles, and their values which seem foreign and restrictive to many outsiders. Muhsinah Ali, Nazeeh Abdul-Hakeem, Sandra Harhash, and Hatim Mukhtar all contribute to the story.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 1, January 1993, p8-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28662
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The famous Anglican minister George Whitefield’s visits to North Carolina and the town of Bath are described. Whitefield was famous for his passionate sermons and drew large crowds when he preached, but this did not happen in North Carolina. Whitefield visited Bath and the state several times and did not like what he experienced initially. Whitefield’s opinions of NC as a place with a “loose” lifestyle of dancing and entertainment and indifference toward religion is documented.
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Record #:
28679
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In the village of St. Helena in Pender County, Saints Peter and Paul Russian Orthodox Church is hanging on thanks to the devotion of its 3 remaining parishioners. The church and its congregation were the center of a small northern European agricultural community created by Hugh MacRae in 1905 near Burgaw, NC. The church was built in 1932 and was the only Russian Orthodox church in North Carolina. Today, the congregation is down to 3 members but they faithfully keeping their religious tradition alive.
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Record #:
29703
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The Museum is currently displaying an egungun costume from the Yoruba people of Nigeria. The costume is used during the annual or biennial egungun ceremony and during funeral rites. The costume is believed to be inhabited by a spirit during the masquerade performance and the wearer may mediate between the world of the living and dead in judicial and tribal matters. The costume is richly decorated and its appearance displays the wealth and status of the family who commissioned the costume.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 2007, p12-13
Record #:
37024
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With voices soaring heavenward, the author asserts choirs resemble what awaits the faithful on both sides of the pew. As for the choir’s role, Kelly posits it is can greatly influence the quality of life—church life now and life hereafter.
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Record #:
37098
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This explanation focused on Communion’s Catholic origin and modern variations of the rite also practiced in many Protestant denominations. Fleshing out the explanation were the presence or absence of wine, practices such as intincting, and how the elements represented the blood and body of Jesus Christ.
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Record #:
35300
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The medical profession played an important role in her decade’s journey of healing. As Rose Turner proved, though, healing also involved a divine entity.
Record #:
36576
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Mounds built by Native Americans, like the ones featured in the accompanying photo, had purposes both prosaic and sacred. Places like Franklin, Bryson City, Murphy have earthen mounds intact, despite the effects of erosion, plowing, and artifact hunters.
Record #:
36180
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Answering this question entailed examining the Ancient Christian and pagan origins for a holiday. Noted were the pagan violent roots tamed or Christian influences eliminated through modern day commercialism. From this came the answer: modern day Christians should celebrate the holiday as ancient Christians would have them do.
Record #:
36177
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Contemplated was the physical resurrection of Jesus Christ and spiritual resurrection of those who believe in His resurrection. Providing proof that the resurrection of flesh and spirit matters equally was an application of Paul’s letters to the Corinthians, Colossians, and Philippians.
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