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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Slavery
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Record #:
1059
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Abstract:
Freddie Parker, a history student in the Carolina Minority Postdoctoral Fellowship Program, is attempting to uncover information about the days of slavery by analyzing advertisements for runaway slaves.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Apr 1993, p20-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
10958
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina author Hinton Rowan Helper's one best-seller, THE IMPENDING CRISIS: HOW TO MEET IT, brought him acclaim in the North and disdain in the South. His book dealt with the effect of slavery upon the three-fourths of the Southern whites who owned no slaves, and, therefore, could not benefit from the system of slavery. By 1860, over 142,000 copies were in print, and it was second in popularity only to UNCLE TOM'S CABIN.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 23, May 1968, p11-12, por
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Record #:
14664
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Abstract:
William Mangum, 92 years old, is an ex-slave. He started out with nothing, but has worked himself into a position where he a large and prosperous land-owner, respected and honored by all who know him.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 8, July 1944, p1-2, 22, f
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Record #:
21541
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Former slave John Carruthers Stanly rose from the depths of slavery to become one of the wealthiest businessmen in North Carolina and a slave owner himself. While a slave, Stanly was taught to read and write and was trained as a barber. His ability to earn a living eventually led to his owner granting him his freedom. As a freeman, Stanly gained increased wealth including plantations, rental properties, and up to 168 slaves. Stanly was held in rather high regard amongst the local white community and was considered a astute businessman. Stanly's family continued to own slaves until the end of the Civil War.
Source:
Administration of Justice Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. 67 Issue 2, 1990, p159-192 , il, por, f
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Record #:
21581
Abstract:
This article examines and calculates the number of slaves imported into North Carolina before slave trade restrictions were imposed in the mid-1790s. Overall slave trade in North Carolina was limited in scope as the state was not part of the triangular trade. Specialized slave merchants in the region were rare as the slave trade was incidental to the activities of the vessels engaging in it. Available records indicate the import of 3,236 slaves through sea routes, almost half from the West Indies.
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Record #:
21589
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In the 19th century before the Civil War, escaped slaves and their collaborators established escape routes by sea to leave North Carolina. This version of the Underground Railroad in Wilmington and other sea ports were so effective during the 1st half of the century that runaway slaves often ran to the coast instead of heading north to reach freedom through overland routes.
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Record #:
21630
Abstract:
This article examines the fate of African-born Muslim slaves in North Carolina, with more scrutiny on the life of Umar ibn Said, an educated and upper class Muslim from Senegal. It delivers details from his life, especially after he became a slave in 1810 on a Cape Fear River plantation owned by James Owen. It also chronicles his conversion to Christianity, which was used by missionaries as an example on how to convert Muslims.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
21772
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This article analyses the divorces and legal separations related to race and slavery during the antebellum era in North Carolina. An overview of divorce proceedings is provided where slaves were forced to side with the head of the household during marital conflict. This highlights the difficulties white women had when attempting to leave bad marriages.
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Record #:
21785
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This article examines the efforts and life of early abolitionist Reverend James O'Kelly. Though he ultimately accepted slavery to appease the powerful white elites of his congregation, O'Kelly wrote on the subject, most notably 'Essay on Negro Slavery' published in 1788.
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Record #:
24617
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As part ten of The Civil War: Life in North Carolina series, this article describes the interstate slave trade in North Carolina, the movement of male slaves to the western part of the state, and what the imminent end of the Confederacy meant for slaveholders, as well as slaves.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p213-214, 216, 218-220, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24669
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Abstract:
Most slaves in North Carolina came second-hand from other states since there was no deep-sea fleet for the state. Regardless, North Carolina accepted the institution of slavery; the author provides a brief history of slavery in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 19, January 1955, p8-9, 16, il
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Record #:
25714
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Students and professors at East Carolina University are chronicling the 25 year journey through slavery and beyond of one Allen Parker.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p26-30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7957
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state adopted its first slave code in 1715. This document defined the social, economic, and physical places of enslaved people. Most of the slaves purchased in the colony came from Virginia and South Carolina, and most lived on large plantations in the eastern section. The largest plantation was Stagville, established in 1787, and located in parts of what is now Orange and three other counties. More than 900 slaves worked on the 30,000-acre plantation.
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Record #:
35285
Abstract:
An excerpt from “A Narrative of the Life, Sufferings, and Escape of John Brown, a Fugitive Slave, now in England,” details the process of tobacco farming in North Carolina from a slave hand’s perspective.
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Record #:
35380
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When the weather turned cold enough, the annual hog killing would start, which was a full day’s work for the slaves.