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21 results for North Carolina, Western--History
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Record #:
3323
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Although his name is more often linked with the state of Kentucky, Daniel Boone and his family lived in the western part of the state from 1751 to 1775. He was well known for his marksmanship and hunting skills.
Record #:
7973
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Daniel Boone came to western North Carolina in 1752 at the age of eighteen and remained there for twenty-one years. On August 14, 1756, he married Rebecca Bryan, a marriage that would last fifty-seven years. In 2006, each of the sites in the state associated with him are holding special events in his honor. Living history reenactments, family festivals, exhibits, and trade fairs are planned for Salisbury, Boone, Wilkesboro, Statesville, Bethabara, and Boone's Cave Park.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 7, July 2006, p56, il
Record #:
10274
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Draughn discusses the outdoor drama, THUNDERLAND, which is based on the life of Daniel Boone and covers his fight to open up and hold the mountain lands of western North Carolina for settlers and pioneers. Herbert (Hubert) Hayes, the play's author, is a direct descendant of Daniel Boone. The drama is performed in Asheville.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 10 Issue 3, July 1952, p24-25, 27, il, por
Record #:
12892
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The visit of William Bartram in 1776 to Western North Carolina was recorded in his book, Travels. In this second installment, The State offers an account from Bartram's encounters with local Cherokee people.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 8, Sept 1959, p14, il
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Record #:
12954
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The sixth part in a series presented by The State, this article offers further excerpts from the classic travel journal of John Lawson, describing his trip along the North Carolina frontier in 1700.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 26, May 1960, p9-10, il
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Record #:
23760
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Hernando de Soto's (1496-1542) North American explorations from 1539-1541 led to the establishment of the first European outposts in the American South, including some in western North Carolina. However, conflicts with native tribes doomed these early efforts.
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Record #:
23864
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F. Scott Fitzgerald spent much time in Western North Carolina in the 1930s as he sought tranquility and a fresh start in his writing career. Huguelet discusses Fitzgerald's time in North Carolina.
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Record #:
23930
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In 1784, the state of North Carolina offered to cede the land from the North Carolina-Virginia border to Georgia, and from the Appalachian mountains to the Mississippi River and form a new state called \"Franklin.\" The article examines the intentions of those urging for Franklin's establishment and the nature of government and politics in post-Revolutionary North America.
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Record #:
24123
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Hart Square is a historic site in Catawba County that consists of buildings collected from farms and ridges throughout Western North Carolina and the Piedmont. The village portrays the life of average people in nineteenth and early-twentieth century Western North Carolina and hosts a number of events to keep this history alive.
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Record #:
24496
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Fly-fishing has long been a popular pastime in North Carolina, particularly in the mountains. The history of the western North Carolina sport dates back to the nineteenth century.
Record #:
24615
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NASCAR has its roots in North Carolina, for it began with mountain moonshiners who rigged to cars fast enough to run from the law and turned into a race culture following the end of Prohibition. With the Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, and a number of older speedways throughout the western part of the state, North Carolina continues to cultivate the rich NASCAR culture.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p176-186, 188, 190, 192, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24617
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As part ten of The Civil War: Life in North Carolina series, this article describes the interstate slave trade in North Carolina, the movement of male slaves to the western part of the state, and what the imminent end of the Confederacy meant for slaveholders, as well as slaves.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 5, October 2014, p213-214, 216, 218-220, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24722
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This article discusses how western North Carolina got its immortal name, The Land of the Sky. Francis Christine Fisher (1846-1920), writing under the name Christian Reid, penned the name in her travel book with the same title.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 24, November 1950, p7, 20, il
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Record #:
24778
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Several writers describe the industries at work in each region of North Carolina. The Eastern, Triangle, Triad, Charlotte, and Western regions are all featured.
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Record #:
24838
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Tourism agencies call Western North Carolina “The Land of the Sky,” but few know the history of how the phrase was coined. In 1875, Salisbury author Frances Fisher Tiernan. known professionally as Christian Reid, published “The Land of the Sky; or, Adventures in Mountain By-Ways,” which was set in Western North Carolina. The book was extremely popular and within a few years, the title became a common marketing phrase for hotels and other businesses in the region.
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