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13 results for Religion--North Carolina
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Record #:
14965
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The first preachers to early Carolina were Episcopalians; they were followed by the Quakers who first settled in Guilford around 1750. Then came the Baptists, Moravians and Lutherans, with the Methodists next in order.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 28, Dec 1942, p2, 19
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Record #:
17529
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One of North Carolina's most well-known country preachers was Elder Pleasant D. Gold, who was born in Rutherford County in 1833. He was educated at Furman University and trained for the law; however, he abandoned it for the ministry. He became a minister in the Missionary Baptist Church but later decided that the Primitive Baptist Church suited him better. He founded ZION'S LANDMARK in Wilson in 1867 and published it for over fifty years. He was also pastor of the local church in Wilson for over fifty years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 21, Oct 1939, p14-15, por
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Record #:
20611
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This article looks at the establishment of various religious groups and their infrastructure in colonial North Carolina, most notably with the establishment of the Anglican Church and its place as the official church of the state. Attention is given to other religious groups whose congregations gained a foothold in the state during this period including Anabaptists, German Reformed, Lutheran, Moravian, Quakers, Baptists, and Presbyterians, as well as laws passed related to religion or to clergy.
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Record #:
21202
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This article examines the Church of the Brethren or Dunkers, and their existence in North Carolina. Two of the six Dunker settlements founded by 1800 survived into the 20th century. Through strong leadership and faith, these settlements have passed many trials and tribulations to keep their existence.
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Record #:
12180
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The Great Revival of the 18th and 19th centuries saw a radical change in the attitude of North Carolina from Godlessness to religious enthusiasm. Aside from this significance, the movement produced a curious phenomenon which has fascinated psychologists ever since -- \"exercises.\" The exercises of revivalists are described as \"falling down,\" and later \"jerking,\" acts supposedly brought on at the height of religious frenzy during an evangelist's sermon.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 5, Aug 1958, p101-103, il
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Record #:
27946
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Palatines, the first settlers in the New Bern area, created the first church in 1710. Shortly after their arrival, Christopher de Graffenried, founder of New Bern, established the Anglican Church which later reorganized into the Episcopal Church. Over the years, many churches of various denominations have been started in New Bern and Craven County.
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Record #:
28382
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The number of Muslims in the Triangle-area is growing and four area Muslims provide a glimpse into their faith lives and the religion itself. They discuss the ideas that many have about their worship practices, family life, sexual roles, and their values which seem foreign and restrictive to many outsiders. Muhsinah Ali, Nazeeh Abdul-Hakeem, Sandra Harhash, and Hatim Mukhtar all contribute to the story.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 1, January 1993, p8-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28679
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In the village of St. Helena in Pender County, Saints Peter and Paul Russian Orthodox Church is hanging on thanks to the devotion of its 3 remaining parishioners. The church and its congregation were the center of a small northern European agricultural community created by Hugh MacRae in 1905 near Burgaw, NC. The church was built in 1932 and was the only Russian Orthodox church in North Carolina. Today, the congregation is down to 3 members but they faithfully keeping their religious tradition alive.
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Record #:
31679
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The Mennonite community in the Grassy Ridge area of Hyde County consists of about one-hundred people in fourteen families, and has been in the area since 1965. This article profiles several members of this community and describes their daily life. Also discussed is the history of Mennonites, and how they became established in North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 12, Dec 1974, p28-29, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35956
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The good old days and nowadays had something in common in the life of Lizzie Austin: her dedication to her walk with Jesus Christ. Attesting to this is her decades of service in Sunday School classroom. Reflected is her character in word and action. As for who could testify to the role model her life provided, three generations could attest to it as well as the interviewers.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p12-18
Record #:
36011
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The resident named for her father’s mule or a family member held values characteristic of Hatteras Island life, such as deep religious beliefs. Activities betraying the time in which she grew up included her mother sewing clothes for a family of twelve. Ways she made a personal mark on her world included opening her home to tourists and village newcomers alike. From such acts of hospitality, a life commonly lived might also be called an uncommon life.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p48-52
Record #:
37884
Abstract:
A collection of church leaders, lay and clergy, from across the state give their views on the blessings North Carolina has to offer. Their insights and prayers for the state cover topics related to its geography, culture, history, spirit, and people. Individuals offering reflections included Billy Graham, and denominations represented were Catholic, Baptist, Presbyterian, Jewish, Episcopal, Moravian, and Methodist. More information about this project, including videos and musical compositions arranged for it, can be found on its website, prayer.ourstate.com.
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